Law of japan – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 11:15:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://const-japan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T131502.299-150x150.png Law of japan – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ 32 32 US interferes with Taiwan and endangers peace https://const-japan.com/us-interferes-with-taiwan-and-endangers-peace/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 08:01:40 +0000 https://const-japan.com/us-interferes-with-taiwan-and-endangers-peace/ James W. Pfister Japan took Taiwan from China in 1895 as a result of the Sino-Japanese War. During World War II, China was promised the return of Taiwan after Japan’s defeat. What happened? How can the US now have a one China policy with the People’s Republic of China (hereafter the PRC) having sovereignty over […]]]>

James W. Pfister

Japan took Taiwan from China in 1895 as a result of the Sino-Japanese War. During World War II, China was promised the return of Taiwan after Japan’s defeat. What happened? How can the US now have a one China policy with the People’s Republic of China (hereafter the PRC) having sovereignty over Taiwan but the PRC cannot possess it? It’s like having title to your house and land, but you can’t be there yourself. The answer, I think, is systematic American interference from World War II through the effects of the Taiwan Relations Act of January 1, 1979.

Previous column:Origins of Chinese sovereignty over Taiwan

Mao’s communist faction won the civil war and announced on October 1, 1949 that the PRC was the successor government to the Republic of China (hereafter ROC). The United States has not recognized the PRC as the government of China. The United States continued to recognize the ROC of Chiang Kai-shek, who had fled in defeat to Taiwan, until January 1, 1979, 29 years later, which must be a record of false legal fiction.

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Japan won’t disclose technology research at risk of overseas military use https://const-japan.com/japan-wont-disclose-technology-research-at-risk-of-overseas-military-use/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 17:55:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-wont-disclose-technology-research-at-risk-of-overseas-military-use/ The Japanese government will not release the results of its research into critical technologies if there is a risk the information could be misused for overseas military purposes or otherwise harm national interests, sources familiar with the matter said on Friday. The results of research on advanced technologies specified in the Economic Security Act will […]]]>

The Japanese government will not release the results of its research into critical technologies if there is a risk the information could be misused for overseas military purposes or otherwise harm national interests, sources familiar with the matter said on Friday.

The results of research on advanced technologies specified in the Economic Security Act will only be shared within associations made up of government officials and private researchers, with certain sensitive information additionally subject to confidentiality agreements, the sources said.

Sanae Takaichi, Japan’s newly appointed minister in charge of economic security, attends a press conference in Tokyo after a cabinet reshuffle on August 10, 2022. (Kyodo) ==Kyodo

The associations will serve as a trial run for a security clearance system the government plans to introduce, which will only allow vetted personnel to handle sensitive information.

Twenty technologies have been listed in the law as potentially critical, including hypersonic technology that could be used for missile development and space-related technology that could evolve into satellite surveillance systems.

Japan’s eagerness to advance in high-tech fields comes as competition has intensified between the United States, China and Russia in a rapidly changing security environment.

The economic security law enacted in May provides a framework for creating an association for each research field to facilitate the development of cutting-edge technologies through public-private cooperation.

The government is expected to invest about 500 billion yen ($3.8 billion) in research from the state economic security fund.

The results will generally be made public to assist universities, companies and other national organizations in the development and practical application of the technologies, except those which should be used for military purposes, such as defense and coast guard .

The government will also impose a confidentiality agreement on sensitive information provided for research purposes, punishable by a year in prison if breached.

The introduction of the security clearance system was proposed during the drafting of the new Economic Security Act, as such a system will prove essential for sharing classified information with overseas authorities. .

But it has yet to be included in the law after several members of the ruling parties raised concerns about the requirement of a background check to pass the screening.

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Biden signs CHIPS Act, approving ISS expansion through 2030 https://const-japan.com/biden-signs-chips-act-approving-iss-expansion-through-2030/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 19:27:31 +0000 https://const-japan.com/biden-signs-chips-act-approving-iss-expansion-through-2030/ The United States is officially committed to operating the International Space Station until 2030. President Joe Biden signed the Semiconductor Production Incentive Creation Act (CHIPS) today (August 9). The act, which Congress approved late last month, is so named because it is committing $53 billion to boost the US semiconductor industry. But it also has […]]]>

The United States is officially committed to operating the International Space Station until 2030.

President Joe Biden signed the Semiconductor Production Incentive Creation Act (CHIPS) today (August 9). The act, which Congress approved late last month, is so named because it is committing $53 billion to boost the US semiconductor industry. But it also has numerous other measures, including a NASA authorization bill – the first to pass Congress in five years.

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Japan: Urge Cambodia to end repression of trade unions https://const-japan.com/japan-urge-cambodia-to-end-repression-of-trade-unions/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 10:58:31 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-urge-cambodia-to-end-repression-of-trade-unions/ (Tokyo) – The Japanese government should pressure Cambodian authorities to stop using Japanese-funded public buses to forcibly remove strikers from picket lines in Phnom Penh, Human Rights Watch said today. today. The Cambodian government’s actions against the workers violated their fundamental rights to strike and freedom of association and expression. Since NagaWorld Casino laid off […]]]>

(Tokyo) – The Japanese government should pressure Cambodian authorities to stop using Japanese-funded public buses to forcibly remove strikers from picket lines in Phnom Penh, Human Rights Watch said today. today. The Cambodian government’s actions against the workers violated their fundamental rights to strike and freedom of association and expression.

Since NagaWorld Casino laid off 1,329 workers in April 2021, former employees have protested outside the central Phnom Penh casino and went on strike in December. Local authorities arrested dozens of striking union activists and forcibly removed them from the strike site in Japanese-funded public buses, transporting them to the outskirts of the capital or to Covid-19 quarantine sites.

“Japan should demand that the Cambodian authorities stop misusing the buses provided with Japanese taxpayers’ money, or risk being complicit in the Cambodian government’s abuses against the strikers,” said Teppei Kasai, head of the Asia program at Human Rights Watch. “The Japanese government should promote the rights of overseas workers, not allowing foreign aid to be used to undermine them.”

On September 27, 2016, the Japanese government signed a grant package of nearly 1.4 billion yen ($10 million) for make a donation 80 buses to Phnom Penh.

In a June 24, 2022 letter, Human Rights Watch asked Japan’s foreign aid agency, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), to disclose whether the Japanese government had expressed concerns or taken action regarding the misuse of buses by the Cambodian government. The agency replied on July 28 that “the Japanese government and JICA have been in close contact with the Cambodian government on a daily basis, including on the human rights situation, and are working on this issue appropriately, but since this is a diplomatic matter, we would like to refrain from commenting on the details of the communication.

It is clear from video footage circulating on social media that officials are using the buses to help break the strike. A video shows at least five uniformed police officers, accompanied by three plainclothes men – one of whom is holding a walkie-talkie – pushing and dragging three striking women down the stairwell of a bus. Human Rights Watch has verified the authenticity of the video, identified the exact location, and matched the interior of the bus with Japanese-funded buses.

NagaWorld Casino’s mass dismissal in April 2021 included the president of the labor rights-backed NagaWorld Khmer Employees Union (LRSU), Chhim Sithar, and other union leaders and activists. Since then, the union has demanded the reinstatement of the dismissed workers, in particular the union leaders, and the payment of fair compensation for those dismissed in accordance with Cambodian labor laws.

In December, the Cambodian authorities immediately and baselessly called the union’s industrial action “illegal”, but the workers continued their strike. Authorities arrested 11 labor activists, including Chhim Sithar, on baseless charges of “incitement” as well as alleged violations of Cambodia’s “abusive law on measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other deadly infectious diseases”, even if the strikers complied with the required Covid-19 measures.

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which Cambodia has ratified, provides for the right to strike. The International Labor Organization (ILO) Committee on Freedom of Association has declared that the right to strike is a right which workers and their organisations, including trade unions and federations, are “entitled to enjoy”, which any restriction on this right “should not be excessive” and that “the legitimate exercise of the right to strike should not entail prejudicial sanctions of any kind, which would involve acts of anti-union discrimination”.

In 1991, Japan issued its Official Development Assistance (ODA) Charter, which includes human rights as one of its principles. The principle regarding how aid should be used in Japan’s ODA Charter states: “Particular consideration should be given to efforts to promote democratization and the introduction of a market economy, and to the situation regarding the protection of fundamental human rights and freedom in the recipient’s country.”

The Cambodian government’s use of vehicles to help forcefully dissolve peaceful union protests undermines workers’ rights to strike, freedom of expression, freedom of association and collective bargaining, a said Human Rights Watch.

“The Japanese government’s commitment to its development assistance charter will raise serious doubts unless immediate and effective action is taken to end Cambodia’s misuse of its buses,” Kasai said. “Tokyo should send a clear message to the Cambodian government that respect for human rights is at the heart of the bilateral relationship.”

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UK boy’s life support to be stopped after long legal battle https://const-japan.com/uk-boys-life-support-to-be-stopped-after-long-legal-battle/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 10:18:11 +0000 https://const-japan.com/uk-boys-life-support-to-be-stopped-after-long-legal-battle/ Published on: 08/06/2022 – 12:18 London (AFP) – A London hospital was due to remove the life support system from Archie Battersbee, a 12-year-old British boy, on Saturday after his parents lost a long and emotional legal battle. Archie’s mother, Hollie Dance, found her unconscious son at home in April with signs he had placed […]]]>

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London (AFP) – A London hospital was due to remove the life support system from Archie Battersbee, a 12-year-old British boy, on Saturday after his parents lost a long and emotional legal battle.

Archie’s mother, Hollie Dance, found her unconscious son at home in April with signs he had placed a rope around his neck, possibly after taking part in an online suffocation challenge.

“It’s been really difficult,” Dance told Sky News on Friday night, bursting into tears, before the family spent the night by Archie’s bedside at the Royal London Hospital.

“Despite the tough, strong face and appearance in front of the cameras so far, I’ve been pretty broken,” she said.

Life-saving assistance was due to be withdrawn by 10 a.m. (0900 GMT), Dance said, although there was no news from the hospital an hour later.

At the entrance to the east London hospital, well-wishers laid flowers and cards, and lit candles in the shape of the letter ‘A’.

“My boy is 12, the same age as Archie, and that puts it into perspective,” Shelley Elias, 43, said after leaving her own offerings at the impromptu vigil.

“I didn’t know what to write because there are no words that will ease the pain,” she said.

In June, a judge agreed with doctors that Archie was “brain dead”, allowing life support to be terminated, but the family fought in court to overturn that.

Arguing that Archie could benefit from treatment in Italy or Japan, they took their case to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, which this week refused to intervene.

The parents also lost a final legal bid to have Archie transferred to a hospice for his final hours.

“All legal avenues have been exhausted,” a spokesman for campaign group Christian Concern, which supports the family, said Friday evening.

“The family is devastated and spending precious time with Archie.”

“Charlie’s Law”

The case is the latest in a series that has pitted parents against the UK legal and healthcare systems.

The involvement of groups such as Christian Concern to support desperate parents has drawn criticism for prolonging the pain for all concerned.

After a very charged battle between the hospital and his parents, 23-month-old Alfie Evans died in April 2018 when medics in Liverpool, northwest England, removed life support.

Her parents had the support of Pope Francis to take her to a clinic in Rome, but lost a final appeal in court days before her death.

Charlie Gard, born in August 2016 with a rare form of mitochondrial disease that causes progressive muscle weakness, died a week before his first birthday after doctors removed life support.

His parents had fought a five-month legal battle to have Charlie taken to the United States for experimental treatment.

Since then, they have been pushing the British government to pass “Charlie’s Law”, a bill that would strengthen the rights of parents in the event of a dispute over the treatment of their children.

“The whole system was stacked against us,” Archie’s mom Dance said.

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Top Thai Law Firm Hires Partner for Japan Launch https://const-japan.com/top-thai-law-firm-hires-partner-for-japan-launch/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:06:07 +0000 https://const-japan.com/top-thai-law-firm-hires-partner-for-japan-launch/ Bangkok-based Kudun and Partners launched its practice in Japan with the hiring of a litigation partner. The company said in a statement that the move is designed to “address Japan’s burgeoning legal needs in Thailand.” For the launch, the firm brought in Emi Rowse Igusa, formerly an advisor at Herbert Smith Freehills, where she practiced […]]]>

Bangkok-based Kudun and Partners launched its practice in Japan with the hiring of a litigation partner.

The company said in a statement that the move is designed to “address Japan’s burgeoning legal needs in Thailand.”

For the launch, the firm brought in Emi Rowse Igusa, formerly an advisor at Herbert Smith Freehills, where she practiced for more than a decade in the firm’s offices in Hong Kong, Tokyo and Bangkok. She moved to Bangkok in 2016 with the firm and left the firm after two years.

In addition to her law practice, Igusa is a professional counselor and has worked as a counselor at two international schools in Thailand. At Kudun, she will also focus on corporate social responsibility and the company’s pro bono initiatives, as well as promoting mental resilience in the workplace.

With the arrival of Igusa, the firm now has 15 partners and 49 other lawyers. Earlier this year, Kudun also hired Thanyaluck Thongrompo from accounting firm PKF Tax and Consulting Services Thailand, as a partner in the firm’s corporate mergers and acquisitions practice.

“Japanese investments have always thrived in Thailand, and with the Covid-19 pandemic slowly but surely becoming a thing of the past, we believe it is time to equip our business with a dedicated Japanese practice to better serve our Japanese clients” , Kudun said. Sukhumananda, founding partner of the firm, in a press release.

Japan is one of Thailand’s top three trading partners. In 2007, the two countries signed a free trade agreement, which eliminates customs duties on more than 90% of bilateral trade. In May, Japan launched a business platform in Bangkok to increase exports of Japanese food products to Thailand, as part of the Japanese government’s plans to increase the country’s annual exports of agricultural, forestry and fishery products to Thailand. $38 billion by 2030.

Other key sectors of trade between the two countries include machinery, metals and transportation.

Japan’s big four law firms – Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu, Mori Hamada & Matsumoto, Anderson Mori & Tomotsune and Nishimura & Asahi – have all established local firms in Bangkok in recent years.

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Biden signs China competition bill to boost U.S. chip production https://const-japan.com/biden-signs-china-competition-bill-to-boost-u-s-chip-production/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 18:51:27 +0000 https://const-japan.com/biden-signs-china-competition-bill-to-boost-u-s-chip-production/ [The stream is slated to start at 2:45 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Joe Biden is set to sign into law on Tuesday a bipartisan bill to invest billions of dollars in domestic semiconductor manufacturing and scientific research, in a bid to […]]]>

[The stream is slated to start at 2:45 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

President Joe Biden is set to sign into law on Tuesday a bipartisan bill to invest billions of dollars in domestic semiconductor manufacturing and scientific research, in a bid to bolster U.S. competitiveness with China and other foreign rivals.

The signing marks a victory for Biden, who campaigned to reach the other side of the aisle and pushed Congress to pass the legislation as a necessity for America’s economy and national security.

The law project, dubbed the Chips and Science Act, includes more than $52 billion for U.S. companies producing computer chips, plus billions more in tax credits to encourage investment in chip manufacturing. It also provides tens of billions of dollars to fund scientific research and development and to spur innovation and the development of other American technologies.

The House and Senate passed the bill last week with near-unanimous Democratic support. A third of Republican senators supported the bill, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Two dozen House Republicans also voted in favour, though others withdrew their support on the eve of the final vote after Senate Democrats unveiled plans to quickly pass an unrelated partisan reconciliation bill. .

Democrats want this tax and spending package, led by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, DN.Y., and Sen. Joe Manchin, DW.V., put to a vote before Congress leaves Washington, DC, for August vacation. They hope to pass it without needing Republican votes in the Senate, where the parties are split 50-50 and Vice President Kamala Harris holds the deciding vote.

McConnell previously warned Democrats that GOP lawmakers would not support the semiconductor bill if they continued to work on a reconciliation package. Talks between Schumer and Manchin on such a package had appeared to break down weeks earlier – but just hours after the Senate voted to pass the Chips and Science Act, Democrats revealed that they had made a deal.

Republicans reacted angrily, and the House Minority Whip’s office asked GOP members in a late-night memo to oppose the chip bill in the vote on Thursday. “They lied about reconciliation,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-California, said on the morning of the vote.

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Democrats, meanwhile, celebrated the passage of the bill. “Now he goes to the White House for the President’s signature and a better future for our country,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, said during a ceremony at the Capitol on Friday morning.

Proponents say it is vital for the United States to increase its production of semiconductors, which are increasingly critical components in a wide range of products, including consumer electronics, automobiles, health equipment and weapon systems.

Biden also blamed chip shortages for skyrocketing inflation that has hampered his presidency. The lack of chips available for manufacturing new cars has been linked to soaring prices for used cars, which are pushing inflation higher.

Fleas have been rare during the Covid-19 pandemic. Factory shutdowns early in the outbreak sidelined chip production in Asia, while consumer demand for automobiles and improved home electronics that need the chips increased during the shutdowns. The United States’ share of global chip production has also fallen sharply in recent decades, while China and other countries have invested heavily in the industry.

The United States makes few of the more advanced types of semiconductors, which are largely produced in Taiwan. Pelosi and a delegation of five House Democrats visited the island, a source of significant tensions with China, earlier Tuesday as part of an Asian tour.

The speaker said the trip was aimed at reaffirming US ties with regional allies, including Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan. But China, which asserts its control over Taiwan, has deployed increasingly belligerent rhetoric towards the United States in response to the tour.

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EDITORIAL | 6 years after The Hague decision on the South China Sea, push for the rule of law https://const-japan.com/editorial-6-years-after-the-hague-decision-on-the-south-china-sea-push-for-the-rule-of-law/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:56:15 +0000 https://const-japan.com/editorial-6-years-after-the-hague-decision-on-the-south-china-sea-push-for-the-rule-of-law/ Six years have passed since the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague in the Netherlands issued a ruling rejecting China’s claim to sovereignty over most of the South China Sea. China ignored the ruling, saying it is simply a piece of “old paperas he makes his unilateral changes to the status quo a done […]]]>

Six years have passed since the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague in the Netherlands issued a ruling rejecting China’s claim to sovereignty over most of the South China Sea. China ignored the ruling, saying it is simply a piece of “old paperas he makes his unilateral changes to the status quo a done deal. The international community must once again strongly condemn China.

The Philippines decided to press charges in January 2013, after China seized a reef, Scarborough Shoal, in 2012, over which the Philippines claims sovereignty. The country’s current foreign minister, Enrique Manalo, released a statement on July 12on the occasion of the sixth anniversary of the judgment.

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Philippine Foreign Secretary Enrique Manalo, with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi before bilateral talks in Manila, Philippines, Wednesday, July 6, 2022. (Jam Sta Rosa/Pool Photo via AP)

Noting the importance of the Hague arbitration, he underlined, thinking of China: “These conclusions are no longer within the reach of denial and refutation, and are conclusive because indisputable. The price is final.

He added: “We strongly reject attempts to undermine it; even erase it from the law, from history and from our collective memories.

Manalo’s statement made it clear that the Philippines’ new administration will focus on the decision and, without naming any specific country, will insist that China respect it.

The new president faces a showdown

Ferdinand Marcos Jr was just sworn in as president of the Philippines at the end of June, and the differences in his administration from the Duterte era are already clear.

Despite its ups and downs, the Duterte administration has distinguished itself by its deference to China. Duterte, who assumed the presidency in June 2016 just before the decision, expected economic support from Beijing and aligned himself with China, echoing that the decision was “just a piece of paper “.

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Filipino activists demand compliance from China on the sixth anniversary of the international tribunal’s decision invalidating China’s claims in the South China Sea. Outside the Chinese consulate in Makati City, the Philippines, July 12, 2022. REUTERS/Eloise Lopez

What happened in the meantime? China has advanced its tactic of turning man-made islands in the South China Sea into military bases. In March 2021, more than 220 Chinese vessels were observed in the waters surrounding the Spratly Islands (called the Nansha Islands by China), over which China and the Philippines claim sovereignty. More than 100 Chinese ships were confirmed in the region in April 2022, increasing tensions in the region. In other words, China seeks to make its unilateral change to the status quo a fait accompli.

Freedom of Navigation Operations

The United States Navy announced that one of its destroyers conducted “freedom of navigation operationsin the South China Sea on July 13 and 16, as the Ronald Reagan Strike Group entered the South China Sea, bring china under control.

In the United States, expectations of the new President Marcos are high. President Biden invited him to visit the United States.

Meanwhile, Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with Marcos earlier in July and possibly invited him to visit China. It seems that a standoff between the United States and China is underway.

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Chinese State Councilor Wang Yi meets with Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos Jr July 6, 2022. Presidential Photographers Division (PPD)/Handout via REUTERS.

Before taking office, Marcos said he would have to walk a “very delicate path” between the United States and China. His foot is not yet firm.

In his first state of the nation address on July 25, however, Marcos’ foreign policy direction seemed clearer. He said, “I will not preside over any process that will relinquish even one square centimeter of territory of the Republic of the Philippines to a foreign power.”

Japan’s support

On July 12, exactly six years after the decision, Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi had a phone conversation with Manalo and briefed him on Japan’s policy of supporting the Philippine Coast Guard with new equipment. The Japanese government should support the Marcos administration in cooperation with the United States.

Cooperation with the Philippines is absolutely essential to achieve the “free and open Indo-Pacific” advocated by the recently assassinated former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

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(Read the editorial in Japanese on this link.)

Author: editorial board, The Sankei Shimbun

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Japan’s Hayashi says ‘brute force logic’ is gaining traction in the Indo-Pacific https://const-japan.com/japans-hayashi-says-brute-force-logic-is-gaining-traction-in-the-indo-pacific/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 19:13:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japans-hayashi-says-brute-force-logic-is-gaining-traction-in-the-indo-pacific/ By David Brunnstrom, Kiyoshi Takenaka Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi delivers a keynote address with Japanese Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Koichi Hagiuda (not pictured) at the U.S.-Japan Economic Policy Advisory Committee (EPCC) at the Department of State in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2022. REUTERS /Tom Brenner/Pool WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa […]]]>

Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi delivers a keynote address with Japanese Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Koichi Hagiuda (not pictured) at the U.S.-Japan Economic Policy Advisory Committee (EPCC) at the Department of State in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2022. REUTERS /Tom Brenner/Pool

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi sounded the alarm over China’s behavior in the Indo-Pacific during a visit to Washington on Friday, saying the “logic of brute force “was gaining ground on the rule of law in the Indo-Pacific. Peaceful.

In a speech to a think tank in Washington, Hayashi referred to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and said such actions should never be allowed anywhere else. He said it was essential that this be seen as a “clear failure” or else other countries would try to change the status quo by force.

Referring to the flights of joint Chinese and Russian bombers near Japan in May, Hayashi said enhanced military coordination between China and Russia was becoming a security concern.

“We stand at a historic crossroads right now, fraught with a sense of crisis,” he told the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “We are facing a decisive moment.” “Even in this region, the ‘logic of brute force’ is gaining ground over the ‘rule of law’, and the strategic balance in the region is increasingly a challenge for Japan and the United States. “, he said, referring to the Indo-Pacific.

Hayashi said “ongoing unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force or coercion in the East and South China Seas” were of growing concern and referred to rising tensions between China and Taiwan. saying that stability across the Taiwan Strait was “extremely important”.

While repeatedly highlighting the threats posed by China, Hayashi largely avoided mentioning it by name, but said it was essential to maintain a “frank and high-level dialogue” with Beijing and that cooperation was essential. also important with her when necessary, such as on climate change. and North Korea.

Hayashi said there was an urgent need to strengthen the deterrence and response capabilities of the Japan-US alliance and said the government in Tokyo planned to significantly increase defense budgets and fundamentally strengthen the defense capabilities of the Japanese-American alliance. five years from now.

Hayashi, who was in Washington to launch a new “two plus two” economic dialogue with the United States, said it was necessary to keep all options, including “counterattack capabilities”, on the table. and build high-tech defense capabilities. .

He also said it was crucial that the credibility of the US’ extended deterrence be bolstered – a reference to the US nuclear weapons umbrella that protects allies, including Japan – while calling on China, which it said he, “was rapidly building up his nuclear force in an opaque environment”. way”, to participate in efforts to reduce nuclear risk.

Reporting by David Brunnstrom and Simon Lewis in Washington and Kiyoshi Takenaka in Tokyo; Editing by Mary Milliken and Chizu Nomiyama

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Comparison of Gun Laws and Gun Deaths Across America https://const-japan.com/comparison-of-gun-laws-and-gun-deaths-across-america/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 23:11:07 +0000 https://const-japan.com/comparison-of-gun-laws-and-gun-deaths-across-america/ Comparison of Gun Laws and Gun Deaths Across America In June 2022, the United States Supreme Court’s decision to repeal concealed weapons legislation in New York sent shock waves across the country. The ruling drew attention to the ongoing debate around US gun laws – a debate that Americans have rudely divergent points of view […]]]>

Comparison of Gun Laws and Gun Deaths Across America

In June 2022, the United States Supreme Court’s decision to repeal concealed weapons legislation in New York sent shock waves across the country.

The ruling drew attention to the ongoing debate around US gun laws – a debate that Americans have rudely divergent points of view on. This lack of consensus is apparent not only in public opinion, but in legislation, with US gun regulations varying widely from state to state.

Which states have the toughest (and loosest) gun regulations? This graph of Elbie Bentley sets the stage for comparing gun laws across America before the impact of the Supreme Court’s decision can be fully understood. It uses 2021 data from Giffords Legal Center and contrasts with gun-related deaths in each state.

States with the strictest gun laws

Since 2010, researchers at Giffords Law Center have been ranking state gun laws across America and seeing if there is a correlation between stricter gun laws and a drop in gun-related deaths. fire.

Here’s a look at the top 10 states with the strictest gun laws and their number of gun-related deaths in 2021:

Rank State Firearm-related deaths in 2021 (per 100,000 people) % difference from the national average
1 California 8.5 -37%
2 New Jersey 5 -63%
3 Connecticut 6 -56%
4 Hawaii 3.4 -75%
5 Massachusetts 3.7 -73%
6 New York 5.3 -61%
seven Mayland 13.5 -1%
8 Illinois 14.1 +3%
9 Rhode Island 5.1 -62%
ten Washington 10.9 -20%

California has the strictest gun laws in the country. Some of the state’s most notable laws are the proactive removal of firearms from persons accused of domestic violence or persons subject to domestic violence protection orders.

In addition to having the strictest gun laws, California also has a relatively low rate of gun-related deaths, at 8.5 deaths per 100,000 population.37% below the national average.

Apart from Illinoisgun-related deaths in the 10 states with the strictest gun laws are all below the national average, with Hawaii ranking lowest for firearm-related deaths at 3.4 deaths per 100,000 people, or 75% below the national average.

States with the most lax gun laws

On the other end of the spectrum, here’s a look at the 10 states with the most lax gun laws and their number of gun-related deaths per 100,000 population:

Rank State Firearm-related deaths in 2021 (per 100,000 people) % difference from the national average
41 Alaska 23.5 +73%
42(T) Arizona 16.7 +22%
42(T) Kentucky 20.1 +48%
44 South Dakota 13.6 -0.4%
45(T) Kansas 16.9 +24%
45(T) Mississippi 28.6 +110%
47 Missouri 23.9 +75%
48 Idaho 17.6 +29%
49 Wyoming 25.9 +90%
50 Arkansas 22.6 +66%

Apart from South Dakotaall states in the bottom 10 have an above-average rate of gun-related deaths. Mississippi has the highest mortality rate at 28.6 per 100,000, which is 110% above the national average.

In Mississippi, you don’t need a permit to carry a concealed weapon, not even on college campuses. And a few years ago the state adopted a law allowing K-12 school employees to bring firearms onto school grounds.

Polarized opinions and uncertain future

The Supreme Court’s recent decision came weeks after dozens of people were killed in a series of mass shootings across the country, including one at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York, and another at a school. elementary school in Uvalde, Texas.

Notably, some states have already responded to the ruling by changing their gun laws. New York passed new legislation banning guns in notable public places, requiring candidates to prove they can use a firearm, and requiring candidates to have their social media accounts reviewed. On the other hand, Maryland has relaxed its gun lawsdirecting law enforcement to be less restrictive on concealed transport applicants.

As all changes are still happening in quick session, time will tell what the upcoming annual review of US gun laws will show about the nation’s gun regulatory landscape.

This article was published as part of Visual Capitalist’s Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite creators from around the world.

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