Japan politics – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 15:10:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://const-japan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T131502.299-150x150.png Japan politics – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ 32 32 The war in Ukraine will impact Asian politics https://const-japan.com/the-war-in-ukraine-will-impact-asian-politics/ Wed, 11 May 2022 15:10:44 +0000 https://const-japan.com/the-war-in-ukraine-will-impact-asian-politics/ The war in Ukraine entered its third month with no diplomatic resolution in sight. Despite this, some have argued that while the war will impact Russia, its neighbors and the rest of Europe, it will have little consequence for Asia or the world order. This is wishful thinking at best, myopia at worst. The Ukrainian […]]]>

The war in Ukraine entered its third month with no diplomatic resolution in sight. Despite this, some have argued that while the war will impact Russia, its neighbors and the rest of Europe, it will have little consequence for Asia or the world order. This is wishful thinking at best, myopia at worst. The Ukrainian crisis is not just about the European security order. It has huge ramifications for the future of order in Asia. And by extension, given that Asia accounts for almost 60% of the world’s population and 32% of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP), it also has huge ramifications for the future of global security and the economy.

There is no doubt that the war in Ukraine will change, and has already changed, the nature of politics in Europe. Most notably, Germany reversed decades of foreign policy after World War II. He announced that he would strengthen his army (dropping his reluctance to invest in his army), seek alternative energy sources (easing dependence on Russian oil and gas) and, more recently, even supply heavy weapons to the Ukraine (an act he had resisted until this month).

But Ukraine’s impact will not be limited to Europe. If this war drags on, economically, politically and diplomatically, Asia and the Asian political order will change. Some of these changes have already taken place.

The most obvious short-term impact is on the economy. Oil, wheat and corn prices have soared. Many countries in Southeast Asia dependent on these imports, such as Thailand, Vietnam and Singapore, have experienced shortages and felt the impact on basic services such as transport, electricity and fuel. Indeed, in Vietnam, some gas stations are running out of gas. The countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have considered strengthening their relations with West Asian countries and Venezuela to guarantee alternative oil supplies. Rising commodity prices threaten to hamper the recovery of Southeast Asian countries from the pandemic, leading to an increased risk of political and economic instability.

Additionally, over 600 Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) have disengaged from Russia resulting in “de-globalization”, proving that it is seemingly possible to decouple economically as the West has done from the Russia. This means that it could, in the long run, like the New York Times said recently, fracture the world into economic blocks. This would have profound and isolating consequences for Asian countries seeking to do business with the United States (US), China and Russia.

Politically, the war in Ukraine has already caused divisions in Asia. Japan and Korea are worried about China and its territorial sovereignty and, predictably, have joined the United States in condemning Russia. However, the Asean bloc is split. On the one hand, the Burmese junta, close to the Russian government, welcomed Moscow’s actions. On the other, Singapore, which has long worried about the balance between China and the United States in Asia-Pacific, condemned Moscow. But there are a few countries in the middle – Vietnam which, like India, is heavily dependent on Russian arms and defense exports, and also has a comprehensive partnership with Ukraine, refrained from condemning Russia at the United Nations.

Finally, there are the diplomatic ramifications of the war in Ukraine, which have the potential to restructure order in Asia. The current international order is ultimately based on the Westphalian system. The Peace of Westphalia of 1648 created the inviolable principle of territorial sovereignty and integrity on which subsequent international orders were based.

The United States, the European Union and Asian countries such as Japan, Korea and Singapore fear that if Russia succeeds in violating Ukraine’s sovereignty and suffers little consequence, it will embolden China. -vis Taiwan, as well as other parts of the world. Pacific that China claims. Beijing is well aware of this concern — Chinese Ambassador to the United States Qin Gang recently wrote in the Washington Post, stating that China supports the concept of territorial sovereignty but that (directly contradicting the claims of President Vladimir Putin), unlike Ukraine, Taiwan is a domestic affair. India may think that Taiwan’s territorial integrity matters less to its security interests than it does to the United States, but it should certainly consider the future implications for its own border territories which China also claims as inviolable territory.

The Ukrainian war is currently geographically confined to Europe. Even if it doesn’t spill over into Asia, it’s crucial to understand that the longer it goes unresolved, the more likely it is to have significant ramifications for Asia.

Manjari Chatterjee Miller is Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, and Associate Professor at Boston University Opinions expressed are personal

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Japan eyes debut of US Indo-Pacific economic plan during Biden visit https://const-japan.com/japan-eyes-debut-of-us-indo-pacific-economic-plan-during-biden-visit/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:17:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-eyes-debut-of-us-indo-pacific-economic-plan-during-biden-visit/ WASHINGTON/TOKYO (Reuters) – U.S. President Joe Biden’s visit to Japan later this month is expected to coincide with the official launch of a new U.S. economic strategy for the Indo-Pacific region, the Japanese ambassador said on Monday. in Washington. Koji Tomita said at a virtual event hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies […]]]>

WASHINGTON/TOKYO (Reuters) – U.S. President Joe Biden’s visit to Japan later this month is expected to coincide with the official launch of a new U.S. economic strategy for the Indo-Pacific region, the Japanese ambassador said on Monday. in Washington.

Koji Tomita said at a virtual event hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington that Japan and the United States have been working on the details of the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (IPEF), which, he said, had to strike a balance between inclusion and high standards.

Asian countries want to strengthen ties with the United States, but have been frustrated by its delay in detailing plans for economic engagement with the region since former President Donald Trump quit a regional trade pact in 2017.

Biden, who is due to visit South Korea and Japan May 20-24, announced the IPEF plan last year, and his administration’s strategy for the Indo-Pacific region announced in February said the plan was to launch it in early 2022.

Tomita said Biden’s visit would send a strong signal that the United States remains focused on the Indo-Pacific despite the war in Ukraine.

“But this is not just a message. I believe the visit will establish in very strong terms that Japan and the United States are prepared to jointly play a leading role in the economic and social development of the Indo region. -wider Pacific,” he said. .

Tomita noted that Biden’s visit would include a summit meeting of the Quad grouping of the United States, Japan, Australia and India, an important vehicle for that purpose.

“I expect the visit to also coincide with the official launch of the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework initiative by the United States. And we are now trying to flesh out the ideas that will be contained in this initiative,” he said. he added.

US Ambassador to Japan Rahm Emanuel said at the same event that Asian countries’ reaction to the Ukraine crisis had helped show Russia and China that they could not act with impunity. when a war breaks out. He said Ukraine did not mean Washington could not maintain its focus on Asia.

“In fact, there are lessons being learned from that that are being applied in real time here in the Indo-Pacific as a deterrent,” he said, without elaborating.

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Japan, Fiji confirm deepening ties amid concerns over China’s influence https://const-japan.com/japan-fiji-confirm-deepening-ties-amid-concerns-over-chinas-influence/ Sat, 07 May 2022 11:16:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-fiji-confirm-deepening-ties-amid-concerns-over-chinas-influence/ TOKYO (Kyodo) — Japan and Fiji confirmed on Saturday that they would continue to cooperate closely for peace and stability in the Pacific region as they shared concerns over a recent security deal between China and the United States. Solomon Islands, the Japanese government said. At a meeting in the Fijian capital, Suva, Japanese Foreign […]]]>

TOKYO (Kyodo) — Japan and Fiji confirmed on Saturday that they would continue to cooperate closely for peace and stability in the Pacific region as they shared concerns over a recent security deal between China and the United States. Solomon Islands, the Japanese government said.

At a meeting in the Fijian capital, Suva, Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi and Fijian Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama, who also serves as Foreign Minister, affirmed the goal of realizing an “Indo-Pacific free and open,” amid China’s growing military and economic weight in the region.

Hayashi also strongly condemned Russia’s military aggression in Ukraine, saying it undermines the foundations of the international order and that it is important for countries that share fundamental values ​​to unite, the Japanese ministry said. Foreign Affairs in a statement.

Hayashi’s three-day trip through Sunday to the Pacific islands of Fiji and Palau came after China announced last month it had signed a security pact with the Solomon Islands in the southwest of the Pacific, fueling concerns about an increase in Beijing’s military influence in the region.

The China-Solomon Islands deal would allow Beijing to deploy forces and dock ships in the islands, though details remain unclear.

Later in the day, Hayashi met Henry Puna, Secretary General of the Pacific Islands Forum and former Prime Minister of the Cook Islands, in Suva. Fiji is the current chair of the 18-member regional body.

On Sunday, Hayashi is due to meet with political leaders in Palau.

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Albert Morton Craig, 93 – Harvard Gazette https://const-japan.com/albert-morton-craig-93-harvard-gazette/ Thu, 05 May 2022 14:35:49 +0000 https://const-japan.com/albert-morton-craig-93-harvard-gazette/ At a meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences On May 3, 2022, the following tribute to the life and service of the late Albert Morton Craig was released in the Faculty’s permanent archives. Albert Craig was born in Chicago on December 9, 1927, the son of Adda Clendenin Craig and Albert Morton Craig. […]]]>

At a meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences On May 3, 2022, the following tribute to the life and service of the late Albert Morton Craig was released in the Faculty’s permanent archives.

Albert Craig was born in Chicago on December 9, 1927, the son of Adda Clendenin Craig and Albert Morton Craig. At age 10, Craig lost his father to a heart attack. Family finances were strained, but he won a swimming scholarship to Northwestern University. There he set a national freshman swimming record.

In 1946, he was enlisted. While stationed in Kyoto, he found time to visit temples and practice judo and met Teruko Ugaya, whom he married in 1953. Returning home, he graduated from Northwestern in philosophy in 1949.

Recipient of one of the first Fulbright scholarships, he studied economic history at the University of Strasbourg for a year and Japanese language and history at Kyoto University from 1951 to 1953, while obtaining a black belt. fourth degree in judo. He then pursued a doctorate. in Far Eastern History and Languages ​​at Harvard, which he completed in 1959. He immediately took up an assistant professorship in the History Department, where he taught until his retirement in 1999.

Craig’s thesis led to a pioneering monograph, “Chōshū in the Meiji Restoration”. His work transformed the historical understanding of the process by which the samurai of Chōshū and other domains overthrew the Tokugawa regime and set in motion Japan’s modernization revolution. Against Japanese interpretations rooted in Marxist scholarship, which located the push for change in a cross-class alliance of inferior samurai and merchants, Craig postulated a “proto-nationalism” rooted in traditional warrior values ​​as the driving force behind significant changes in that time. . Craig reveled in respectful debate on big issues. In the afterword to “Chōshū”, he writes, “I invariably learn more from disagreeing with Professor Tōyama than from agreeing with most other writers”.

Over the next few decades, Craig dug deep into the work of Fukuzawa Yukichi, Japan’s most important public intellectual of the modernizing decades of the late 19th century. Through careful research – it would have been immensely easier in our age of digital research – he found important sources of Fukuzawa’s knowledge of the West in popular English-language readers aimed at school children. Craig published articles and later two books—one with translations by Teruko—on Fukuzawa’s writings.

He co-authored several textbooks on East Asia and world history, writing sections that showed his passion for the history of regions far beyond Japan. Not a talker, Craig showed his curiosity over lunches with colleagues by persistently asking about trends in the study of their part of the world. He once started a counseling conversation with a graduate student by saying, “Before we start, how is your family? Teruko always tells me that I have to remember to ask that.

In 1961, President Kennedy appointed Craig’s mentor and senior colleague, Edwin Reischauer, Ambassador to Japan. With a number of talented graduate students suddenly in need of guidance, the History Department promoted Craig, after only a year as an assistant professor, to a permanent position. In a letter to the department director, Reischauer wrote that Craig was “at the top of his age class in Japanese history and with the few real stars.” Over the next four decades, Craig educated generations of Japanese historians, supervising more than 40 doctoral dissertations. For nearly three decades, he also taught thousands of undergraduates in a general education course colloquially called “Rice Paddies,” which focused during his early years, along with John Fairbank and Benjamin Schwartz, on history. of East Asia, then, with Edwin Reischauer and Henry Rosovsky each for more than a decade, on the history specifically of Japan. In peak years – usually in times of economic stress – the course had over 400 students.

Craig encouraged graduate students to broaden their horizons in pursuit of their interests, from eighth-century demographic history to the social and political history of postwar Japan. When asked how he achieved this, he sometimes joked that his pedagogy was inspired by Japanese master craftsmen, who expected their apprentices to steal the master’s secrets through observation. In fact, he combined frequent requests of the “so what” variety with high expectations and strong, low-key support from his students. He offered constant interest and encouragement in the work of junior colleagues in Chinese and Korean history, including the authors of this minute.

Craig held several important administrative positions during his career, including associate director for Japan at the East Asian Research Center (now Fairbank Center) and director of the Japan Institute (now Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies). But his most impactful leadership roles have arguably focused on China and Korea. While directing the Harvard-Yenching Institute (HYI) from 1976 to 1987, he quickly integrated China into the Institute’s programs as soon as the United States and the People’s Republic of China established diplomatic relations in 1979. , ending a 30-year rift in its original close ties with scholars and scholars from mainland China. Through skilful budgetary management, he doubled the number of researchers invited by the Institute to Harvard each year, rebuilding these bridges without reducing the flow of Korean, Japanese, Taiwanese or Hong Kong researchers.

Craig did not wear his politics on his sleeve, but his commitment to political and intellectual freedom was strong. In 1982, Korean Democratic leader Kim Dae-jung was released from prison in Korea and exiled to the United States. Dr. Kim has long been invited to conduct research at Harvard. As the Korean Institute had yet to be founded, a logical home for Kim would have been the Fairbank Center, but professors affiliated with the Center declined the invitation “because he was not an academic”. Hearing this, Craig told the Executive Director of HYI, a historian of Korea, that “HYI normally does not affiliate non-academics but, in this case, we can make an exception.”

In retirement, Craig continued to pursue his passions for research, writing and swimming. At 80, he set a swimming world record for his age group.

Albert Craig died on December 1, 2021. He is survived by his wife, Teruko; sons Jean and Paul; and three grandchildren. A daughter, Sarah, died in 1992.

Respectfully submitted,

stone bowl
Carter Eckert
Henry Rosovsky
Andrew Gordon, President

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A Japanese look at America https://const-japan.com/a-japanese-look-at-america/ Tue, 03 May 2022 19:37:57 +0000 https://const-japan.com/a-japanese-look-at-america/ Newnan resident Lawrence W. Reed is Chairman Emeritus of the Foundation for Economic Education. His most recent book is “Was Jesus a Socialist?” He can be contacted at lreed@fee.org. In the early 1830s, French political philosopher and historian Alexis de Tocqueville traveled across America. He compiled his observations in “Democracy in America,” widely recognized as […]]]>

Newnan resident Lawrence W. Reed is Chairman Emeritus of the Foundation for Economic Education. His most recent book is “Was Jesus a Socialist?” He can be contacted at lreed@fee.org.

In the early 1830s, French political philosopher and historian Alexis de Tocqueville traveled across America. He compiled his observations in “Democracy in America,” widely recognized as a classic study of the cultural and political milieu of a country then only half a century old.

Tocqueville’s ideas were so powerful that “Democracy in America” ​​ranks as must-read if one wants to understand what life was like here in the 1830s.

Much less known is another author who studied America 3 and a half decades later. He came from the other side of the world – Japan – and his name was Mori Arinori. His 1871 book, “Life and Resources in America,” resonates with a penetrating insight into America from a uniquely foreign perspective.

By any measure, Mori’s short life was remarkable. Born in August 1847 into a family of samurai (hereditary military nobility), he enrolled at the age of 18 at University College London in Great Britain. There he studied naval surveying, physics and mathematics.

While in London, he praised Christianity for helping to create an “extraordinary degree of enlightenment” in the countries where it prevailed.

Mori took time from his experience in London to visit the United States in 1867. He was only 20 years old. Four years later, he would be named Japan’s first ambassador to America, a position he held for two years. His subsequent CV is just as impressive:

Ambassador to China, 1875. Founder of Japan’s first commercial college, precursor to what is now Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo. Ambassador to Britain, 1879-84. Minister of Education in Japan, 1885-1889.

Mori deeply valued the ideals of America’s founding. He believed that they were responsible for the progress of the country. In his words,

The secret of the unprecedented growth and daily increasing power of the United States is that government, in its practical operation, is confined within the narrowest bounds; that he is the agent, and not the master, of the people. A prosperous, happy, and permanent republican government can only be assured when the people who live in it are virtuous and well-educated.

Mori, however, was negatively impressed with American politics. At the time, he thought Congress was made up largely of “just full-time politicians.” He wrote: “This class of citizens has greatly multiplied…and it is safe to say that almost all the troubles which befall the country are the result of their petty plans and selfish intrigues.

“America’s business is business,” President Calvin Coolidge said in the 1920s. Mori Arinoro would have agreed. Additionally, while allowing occasional tricksters, Mori believed that “permanent success in business depends chiefly on character”. The “average American merchant,” he writes, “is a man who deserves and receives universal respect.”

The generosity of Americans dazzles Mori. Of the merchants in particular he wrote: “They devote themselves to business with unceasing activity and are the men who generally take pleasure in spending their surplus capital in all sorts of benevolent institutions, religious and educational.

His incredible career was cut short in 1889. At just 41, Mori was murdered by a man who thought he was too “modern” in his outlook. But he had accumulated more in four decades than most people in twice as long.

Newnan resident Lawrence W. Reed is Chairman Emeritus of the Foundation for Economic Education. His most recent book is “Was Jesus a Socialist?” He can be reached at lreed@fee.org.

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Kim warns North Korea could use nukes ‘preventively’ | Government and politics https://const-japan.com/kim-warns-north-korea-could-use-nukes-preventively-government-and-politics/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 11:04:17 +0000 https://const-japan.com/kim-warns-north-korea-could-use-nukes-preventively-government-and-politics/ By KIM TONG-HYUNG – Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has again warned that the North could use its nuclear weapons preemptively if threatened, as he praised his top military officials for a great military parade in the capital, Pyongyang, this week. Kim expressed his “strong will” to […]]]>

By KIM TONG-HYUNG – Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has again warned that the North could use its nuclear weapons preemptively if threatened, as he praised his top military officials for a great military parade in the capital, Pyongyang, this week.

Kim expressed his “strong will” to continue to develop his nuclear army so that it can “preemptively and comprehensively contain and thwart all dangerous attempts and threatening movements, including ever-increasing nuclear threats from hostile forces, if necessary,” the North Korean official said. The Central News Agency said on Saturday.

KCNA said Kim called his military officials to salute their work at Monday’s parade, where the North displayed the biggest weapons in its nuclear arsenal, including intercontinental ballistic missiles that could potentially reach the American homeland. The North has also deployed a variety of shorter-range solid-fuel missiles designed to be fired from ground vehicles or submarines, which pose a growing threat to South Korea and Japan.

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KCNA did not say when Kim’s meeting with senior military brass took place.

The parade marking the 90th anniversary of North Korea’s military came as Kim revived nuclear policy aimed at forcing the United States to accept the idea of ​​his country as a nuclear power and remove crippling economic sanctions .

Addressing thousands of soldiers and spectators mobilized for the parade, Kim vowed to develop his nuclear forces at the “fastest possible speed” and threatened to use them if provoked. He said his nuclear weapons would “never be confined to the sole mission of deterrence of war” in situations where the North faces threats outside its “fundamental interests”.

Kim’s comments suggested he would continue a provocative run in weapons testing to increase pressure on Washington and Seoul. South Korea will inaugurate a new conservative government in May that may take a tougher line on Pyongyang following incumbent liberal President Moon Jae-in’s engagement policies that have produced few results.

Kim’s threat to use his nuclear forces to protect his country’s ambiguously defined “fundamental interests” may portend an escalating nuclear doctrine that could further worry South Korea, Japan and the United Statesexperts say.

North Korea has carried out 13 rounds of weapons launches so far this year, including its first full test of an ICBM since 2017, as Kim exploits an enabling environment to advance its weapons program as the UN Security Council remains divided and effectively paralyzed. Russia’s war in Ukraine.

There are also signs that North Korea is rebuilding tunnels at a nuclear testing ground that was last active in 2017. Some experts say the North may try to conduct a new test between the inauguration of the South Korean President-elect Yoon Suk Yeol on May 10. and his scheduled summit with US President Joe Biden on May 21 to maximize his political effect.

US State Department deputy spokeswoman Jalina Porter said the United States was aware of reports that North Korea may be preparing to conduct a nuclear test, which she said would be deeply destabilizing for the region and would undermine the global non-proliferation regime,

“We urge the DPRK to refrain from any destabilizing activity and instead engage in serious and sustained dialogue,” she said, referring to North Korea by its official name, the Democratic People’s Republic. from Korea.

Kim’s recent remarks followed a fiery statement released by her powerful sister earlier this month in which she lambasted South Korea’s defense minister for touting preemptive strike capabilities against the North. She said her country’s nuclear forces would annihilate conventional forces in the South if provoked.

Yoon, during his campaign, also spoke of bolstering the South’s preemptive strike capabilities and missile defenses. He also pledged to strengthen South Korea’s defense alongside its alliance with the United States.

While Kim’s collection of ICBMs has attracted a lot of international attention, North Korea since 2019 has also expanded its arsenal of short-range solid-fuel missiles threatening South Korea.

The North describes some of these missiles as “tactical” weapons, which experts say communicate a threat to arm them with smaller nuclear bombs on the battlefield and use them proactively in conventional warfare to blunt stronger conventional forces from South Korea and the United States. About 28,500 American soldiers are stationed in the South.

North Korea could use its upcoming nuclear test to claim that it has acquired the ability to build a small nuclear warhead to fit these missiles or other weapons it has recently tested, including a purported hypersonic missile and a long-range cruise missile, analysts say. Smaller warheads would also be needed for the northern pursuit of a multiple-warhead ICBM.

“Solid-fuel missiles are easier to hide, move and launch quickly, making them less vulnerable to a preemptive strike,” said Leif-Eric Easley, professor of international studies at Ewha Womans University in Seoul.

“Combined with ambitions for tactical nuclear warheads, submarine-based launch capabilities and more sophisticated ICBMs, Pyongyang is not just looking to deter an attack. Its goals extend to outrunning South Korea in an arms race and coercing the United States to reduce sanctions enforcement and security cooperation with Seoul,” Easley added.

Nuclear talks between Washington and Pyongyang have stalled since 2019 over disagreements over a possible easing of US sanctions in exchange for North Korean disarmament measures.

Kim has stuck to his goals of simultaneously developing nuclear weapons and the country’s dismal economy in the face of international pressure and has shown no willingness to completely give up a nuclear arsenal he sees as his greatest guarantee. of survival.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Democrats consider additional tax cuts amid financial windfall | United States government and politics https://const-japan.com/democrats-consider-additional-tax-cuts-amid-financial-windfall-united-states-government-and-politics/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:17:08 +0000 https://const-japan.com/democrats-consider-additional-tax-cuts-amid-financial-windfall-united-states-government-and-politics/ SANTA FE, NM (AP) — The Legislature’s chief budget negotiator wants New Mexico lawmakers to consider dramatically reducing personal income tax rates — or eliminating the tax. Democratic State Rep. Patricia Lundstrom of Gallup made the proposal in a bulletin this week distributed by the Legislature’s Office of Budget and Accountability. The House is due […]]]>

SANTA FE, NM (AP) — The Legislature’s chief budget negotiator wants New Mexico lawmakers to consider dramatically reducing personal income tax rates — or eliminating the tax.

Democratic State Rep. Patricia Lundstrom of Gallup made the proposal in a bulletin this week distributed by the Legislature’s Office of Budget and Accountability. The House is due to be elected in November before its next regulatory legislative session in 2023.

Lundstrom is chair of the Legislature’s Main Estimates drafting committee and notes that the state government receives nearly $2 billion a year in personal income taxes, nearly a quarter of annual obligations. expenditure from the general fund.

“The idea of ​​reducing or eliminating personal income tax is not without its challenges,” Lundstrom said. “The state cannot eliminate the tax without recovering at least some of the revenue elsewhere.”

Personal income tax is a rapidly growing source of revenue for the state, propelled by a recently increased top rate of 5.9% on higher incomes. Rates start at 1.7% for low-income residents.

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The proposal has raised concern among Democrats that New Mexico’s overall tax burden could shift toward low-income residents, amid increased reliance on revenue from the oil and natural gas industry.

This year, lawmakers have increased spending, cut taxes and approved payments of up to $1,500 per household to offset rising consumer prices, amid a fiscal windfall in federal pandemic relief and revenues linked to record oil production.

“We have record revenues, but that also means those are still coming from oil and gas,” State Representative Andrea Romero of Santa Fe said Thursday. “We’re in a boom cycle right now. But what follows the boom? It’s inevitable. … We have to be really smart.

The tax relief includes a slight reduction in gross receipts taxes on sales and business transactions and the elimination of Social Security income taxes for retirees earning less than $100,000 or households earning less than $150. 000 dollars. General fund spending increases by $1 billion, or 14%, for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Lundstrom lists several states in the southeastern United States that have recently proposed or enacted personal income tax rate reductions. She said New Mexico has “sufficient” financial reserves to keep state spending stable.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Japanese foreign minister promises stronger military to help US https://const-japan.com/japanese-foreign-minister-promises-stronger-military-to-help-us/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 14:03:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japanese-foreign-minister-promises-stronger-military-to-help-us/ ABOARD USS LINCOLN (Reuters) – Japan’s foreign minister vowed his country would bolster its military to help the United States maintain regional security during a visit to a U.S. aircraft carrier patrolling the waters on Saturday Asians. “Today I got to experience the frontline of national security firsthand,” Yoshimasa Hayashi told reporters in the hangar […]]]>

ABOARD USS LINCOLN (Reuters) – Japan’s foreign minister vowed his country would bolster its military to help the United States maintain regional security during a visit to a U.S. aircraft carrier patrolling the waters on Saturday Asians.

“Today I got to experience the frontline of national security firsthand,” Yoshimasa Hayashi told reporters in the hangar deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln sailing in waters south of Tokyo. Japan will “dramatically strengthen” its defense capabilities and work closely with the United States, he added.

Hayashi spoke as Japan feared that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which it sees as an affront to international diplomatic norms, would encourage neighboring China to use its military forces to seize control of the country. Taiwan and threaten neighboring Japanese islands.

Japan has also expressed concern over the deepening security ties between Beijing and Moscow, which have included joint exercises in the waters surrounding Japan.

China has said its intentions in Asia are peaceful.

USS Abraham Lincoln deploys from Naval Air Station San Diego in January. © Reuters

Hayashi flew to the carrier from Tokyo with US Ambassador Rahm Emanuel, who warned that the invasion of Ukraine, which Russia describes as a ‘special operation’, posed security risks in regions well beyond Europe, including the Indo-Pacific.

The two observed the aircraft carrier’s flight operations from the deck of the Lincoln, which had just left the Sea of ​​Japan near the Korean Peninsula where it had conducted naval exercises with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force after the last missile launch by North Korea.

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Japan’s ruling party to propose more defense spending, aiming for 2% of GDP https://const-japan.com/japans-ruling-party-to-propose-more-defense-spending-aiming-for-2-of-gdp/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 12:19:37 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japans-ruling-party-to-propose-more-defense-spending-aiming-for-2-of-gdp/ The ruling Liberal Democratic Party will propose to the government a sharp increase in defense spending, party members said on Thursday, suggesting they would demand, at a minimum, an amount equivalent to 2% of the country’s gross domestic product, or double the current level. The party’s draft proposal to revise the government’s national security strategy […]]]>

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party will propose to the government a sharp increase in defense spending, party members said on Thursday, suggesting they would demand, at a minimum, an amount equivalent to 2% of the country’s gross domestic product, or double the current level.

The party’s draft proposal to revise the government’s national security strategy will also include the controversial idea of ​​possessing the capability to disable an enemy country’s missiles, as well as its command and control systems.

The party’s National Security Research Commission proposal will be submitted to Prime Minister Fumio Kishida next week so that it can be reflected in the government’s review of the long-term directive, which is to be finalized by here the end of the year.

The proposal to acquire such an attack capability, however, could stoke fears that the country could deviate from its exclusively defense-oriented policy under the war-absent Constitution.

The move comes amid China’s growing military influence at a time when Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has left many wondering what it might mean for the region’s security. North Korea’s launch of intercontinental ballistic missile tests last month has also highlighted the country as a growing missile and nuclear threat.

“With the defense spending target of more than 2% of GDP for NATO countries in mind, our country also aims to achieve that the budget reaches a level necessary to fundamentally strengthen defense capabilities in five years,” the draft proposal reads, referring to the numerical target for members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Japan’s defense budget for the current fiscal year to March 2023 was 5.4 trillion yen ($42 billion), marking a record eight consecutive years and up 1, 1% compared to the initial budget of the previous year. The budget has increased for 10 consecutive years.

Japan’s real GDP for 2021 was 536.79 trillion yen, according to the Cabinet Office.

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Macron talks about his green credentials ahead of the French elections https://const-japan.com/macron-talks-about-his-green-credentials-ahead-of-the-french-elections/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 02:44:45 +0000 https://const-japan.com/macron-talks-about-his-green-credentials-ahead-of-the-french-elections/ Marseille, France- President Emmanuel Macron has promised to put the environment at the heart of his government if he is re-elected next weekend – in a speech he gave in the south of France on Saturday intended to please the public. young voters and environmentalists. Macron held a large rally in the port city of […]]]>

President Emmanuel Macron has promised to put the environment at the heart of his government if he is re-elected next weekend – in a speech he gave in the south of France on Saturday intended to please the public. young voters and environmentalists.

Macron held a large rally in the port city of Marseille while his rival, far-right leader Marine Le Pen, traveled to a village west of Paris.

Polls show Macron extending his lead over Le Pen, with a new poll by Ipsos Sopra/Steria on Saturday suggesting Macron would triumph with 55.5% to Le Pen’s 44.5%.

“I hear the anxiety that exists in many of our young people. I see young people, teenagers, who are afraid for the future of our planet,” Macron told the rally.

He acknowledged the “powerful message” sent in the first round of elections on April 10, when nearly 8 million voters backed far-left candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon and his very green agenda.

“It’s up to us to react and it’s up to us to act,” Macron said.

As well as promising to make France “the first major nation to abandon gas, oil and coal”, Macron said he would appoint a prime minister who would be officially in charge of “ecological planning”.

He also pledged new investments in renewable technologies, energy-efficient home renovations and organic food production, while pledging to tackle air pollution and single-use plastics.

The speech was a clear pitch for young left-wing voters who backed Melenchon and Greens candidate Yannick Jadot in the first round, and who will be crucial in the second round on April 24.

The idea of ​​a prime minister in charge of “ecological planning” was first proposed by Mélenchon.

Macron has accused Le Pen of being “a climate change skeptic”, attacking her for offering to dismantle wind turbines, which she sees as costly and inefficient eyesores.

Polls show the environment is a top priority for French voters, but it was overshadowed during the election campaign by the war in Ukraine and the soaring cost of living.

Several hundred activists from the climate activist group Extinction Rebellion blocked a main artery in central Paris on Saturday to denounce the “inaction” of politicians.

“It’s the only way to make sure everyone talks a bit about climate change,” said Antoine, a young Extinction Rebellion activist who declined to give his last name.

French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen is campaigning on Saturday in Saint-Rémy-sur-Avre. | AFP-JIJI

Meanwhile, Le Pen was visiting the village of Saint Rémy-sur-Avre, around an hour and a half drive west of the capital, where she came out on top in the first lap last weekend.

After hearing complaints about the loss of hospital beds and local bus services, she vowed to “govern the country like a mother, with common sense” and stand up for “the most vulnerable”.

She has sought to tone down her image in this year’s campaign, emphasizing her proposals for solutions to the rising cost of living rather than her usual topics of immigration and Islam.

Union-backed rallies against the far right were held in major cities on Saturday. Nearly 23,000 people took part in the demonstrations, according to estimates by the Ministry of the Interior: 150,000 according to the organizers of the rallies.

Le Pen has faced repeated questions this week about her plan to ban the Islamic headscarf in public places, which she says will be met with fines by the police.

The 52-year-old mother-of-three admitted on Saturday it was a “complex issue” and would be discussed by parliament if she won.

But “we must solve the problem of women who are forced to wear it under pressure from Islamists,” she said.

She has also sought to woo leftist voters, which she will need to defeat Macron.

“We speak to all French people,” she told a rally in the southern city of Avignon on Thursday evening. “We hold a firm hand but of friendship and respect.”

Although both candidates claim to have strong environmental agendas, they have clear differences in foreign policy, attitudes towards immigration and the economy.

Eurosceptic Le Pen wants to revisit France’s commitments to the European Union and has proposed closer ties between the Western military alliance NATO and Russia once the war in Ukraine is over.

Macron and Le Pen are set to meet on Wednesday evening in a crucial one-on-one debate that has proven crucial in swaying voters in the past.

Meanwhile, investigative site Mediapart reported on Saturday that the EU’s anti-corruption office, OLAF, delivered a report to French prosecutors last month accusing Le Pen of fraudulently using the money that she received when she was an MEP between 2004 and 2017.

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