Japan climate – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 07:17:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://const-japan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T131502.299-150x150.png Japan climate – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ 32 32 From China to Germany, floods expose climate vulnerability https://const-japan.com/from-china-to-germany-floods-expose-climate-vulnerability/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 06:40:29 +0000 https://const-japan.com/from-china-to-germany-floods-expose-climate-vulnerability/ The deadly floods that changed life in China and Germany were a stark reminder that climate change is making weather conditions more extreme around the world. At least 25 people in central China’s Henan Province died Tuesday, including a dozen trapped in a city subway as waters ripped through the regional capital of Zhengzhou after […]]]>

The deadly floods that changed life in China and Germany were a stark reminder that climate change is making weather conditions more extreme around the world.

At least 25 people in central China’s Henan Province died Tuesday, including a dozen trapped in a city subway as waters ripped through the regional capital of Zhengzhou after days of torrential rain.

Coming after flooding killed at least 160 people in Germany and 31 others in Belgium last week, the disaster reinforced the message that significant changes must be made to prepare for similar events in the future.

“Governments must first realize that the infrastructure they have built in the past, or even recent ones, are vulnerable to these extreme weather events,” said Eduardo Araral, associate professor and co-director of the Institute. of Water Policy, to Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.

In Europe, climate change is likely to increase the number of large, slow storms that can persist longer in an area and cause downpours of the type seen in Germany and Belgium, according to a study published on June 30 in the journal. Geophysical Research Letters. .

As the atmosphere warms with climate change, it also retains more moisture. This means that more rain is released when the rain clouds break.

By the end of the century, such slow storms could be 14 times more frequent, the researchers found in the study using computer simulations.

While the flooding that devastated vast swathes of western and southern Germany occurred thousands of miles from the events in Henan, both cases highlighted the vulnerability of densely populated areas to the catastrophic floods and other natural disasters.

“We need technical measures – strengthening dikes and flood barriers. But we also need to reshape cities, ”said Fred Hattermann of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. He said the focus was increasingly on so-called “green adaptation” measures, such as polders and plains that can be flooded, to prevent water from flowing too quickly.

“But when there is really heavy rain, all of that may not help, so we have to learn to live with it,” he said.

Strengthening dikes and climate protection for housing, roads and urban infrastructure will cost billions. But dramatic cellphone footage of people struggling in subways submerged in chest-deep water in Zhengzhou, or crying in fear as mud and debris swept through medieval German cities, clearly showed the cost of do nothing.

“It’s shocking and I have to say it’s scary,” said John Butschkowski, a Red Cross driver who took part in rescue operations in western Germany this week. “It’s ghostly; no one anywhere, just garbage. And it is inconceivable that this will happen in Germany.

Koh Tieh-Yong, a meteorologist and climatologist at the University of Social Sciences of Singapore, said a comprehensive assessment of rivers and hydraulic systems would be needed in areas vulnerable to climate change, including cities and farmland.

“Flooding usually occurs due to two factors combined: one, more rainfall than normal and two, insufficient capacity of rivers to carry the extra rainwater collected,” he said.

In China and northwestern Europe, disasters followed a period of unusually heavy rains – equivalent in the Chinese case to a year of rain dumped in just three days – which completely overwhelmed flood defenses.

After several severe floods in recent decades, the buffer zones have been reinforced along major German rivers such as the Rhine or the Elbe. But last week’s extreme rainfall has also turned minor tributaries, like the Ahr or the Swist, into fearsome torrents.

In China, built-up urban areas with inadequate water drainage and large dams that altered the natural flow of the Yellow River basin may also have contributed to the disaster, scientists said.

But measures such as improving the resilience of buildings, raising banks and improving drainage are unlikely to be enough on their own to prevent the effects of severe flooding. As a last resort, warning systems – which have been heavily criticized in Germany for not allowing enough time to react – will need to be improved.

“It really has to be grounded in people’s working knowledge so that they know what to do,” said Christian Kuhlicke, head of a working group on environmental hazards and extreme events at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research.

“If you can’t hold the water, if you can’t save your buildings, at least make sure all the vulnerable people are moved out of these places.”

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US team doctor apologizes after comparing Olympic COVID protocols to Nazi Germany – NBC New York https://const-japan.com/us-team-doctor-apologizes-after-comparing-olympic-covid-protocols-to-nazi-germany-nbc-new-york/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 06:12:20 +0000 https://const-japan.com/us-team-doctor-apologizes-after-comparing-olympic-covid-protocols-to-nazi-germany-nbc-new-york/ The chiropractor for the US women’s wrestling team apologized after comparing Olympic COVID-19 protocols to Nazi Germany in a social media post. Rosie Gallegos-Main, a women’s wrestling chiropractor since 2009, said in a letter to the American Wrestling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee Wednesday that she was sorry “for my poor judgment and my choice […]]]>

The chiropractor for the US women’s wrestling team apologized after comparing Olympic COVID-19 protocols to Nazi Germany in a social media post.

Rosie Gallegos-Main, a women’s wrestling chiropractor since 2009, said in a letter to the American Wrestling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee Wednesday that she was sorry “for my poor judgment and my choice to share this post “.

The post, sent to his Instagram and Facebook accounts last week, was flagged by both social media platforms for spreading disinformation.

“We went from ‘flattening the curve in 14 days’ to ‘going door to door to see your papers’… I have to admit I brought in NAZI that one,” the post said.

Gallegos-Main deleted his post hours after The Associated Press brought it to the attention of the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee on Tuesday.

She will be allowed to complete her planned stay at the USA Wrestling Pre-Olympic Camp in Nakatsugawa, Japan. This is her third Olympic Games with women’s wrestling, although she is not part of the American delegation accredited to Tokyo. She will also need to take training on diversity, equity and inclusion.

“The USOPC does not condone or condone any behavior that intentionally offends or attacks others,” the USOPC said Wednesday in a statement to the PA. “The post that this volunteer shared is totally incompatible with our values ​​and we made it clear to her as soon as we learned about it.

“As evidenced by her swift removal from action and her apologies, she showed clear remorse and engaged in an educational process with the experts at DE&I. USOPC will work with USA Wrestling to ensure that it obtains this educational resource and understands the global goal shared by our organization of building a better and more inclusive world through sport.

Gallegos-Main said she “hadn’t thought about how the ending of the meme might affect others” and said she was “emphasizing coercion by authorities, rather than everything. what concerns Germany and the Jewish people “.

“I now see that these are linked and cannot be separated,” she wrote. “I will never use this word again in a form that does not have a proper basis for its use, like in a history lesson or to educate people about the past.”

“I am deeply saddened by this and would like to apologize for my lack of judgment and my choice to share this message. I am also sorry that this may have been a distraction for the delegation which should focus on supporting our athletes at the best of our ability.

The approximately 22,000 athletes, officials, coaches and media who traveled to Japan for the Games are living under strict restrictions to prevent an upsurge in infections among the country’s general population. Japanese officials said Monday that 21.6% of the country’s 126 million people were fully immunized.

Foreigners were required to provide proof of negative viral tests within 72 hours of leaving for Tokyo and are tested throughout their stay. Travelers spent hours waiting for documents to be approved at airports, and visitors were mostly barred from interacting with the Japanese public during their first 14 days in the country.


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Live markets, Thursday July 22, 2021 https://const-japan.com/live-markets-thursday-july-22-2021/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 22:34:48 +0000 https://const-japan.com/live-markets-thursday-july-22-2021/ AGL, the country’s largest greenhouse gas emitter, has pledged to give shareholders a vote on the climate policies of its two proposed spin-off businesses as it faces new calls to join stricter and faster climate targets. As the acceleration of the transition to clean energy continues to weigh on the profits of the power giant, […]]]>

AGL, the country’s largest greenhouse gas emitter, has pledged to give shareholders a vote on the climate policies of its two proposed spin-off businesses as it faces new calls to join stricter and faster climate targets.

As the acceleration of the transition to clean energy continues to weigh on the profits of the power giant, the board of directors is embarking on a plan to split into two companies: AGL Australia, which would own its divisions of retailing of carbon neutral electricity, gas and telecommunications as well as cleaner production assets; and Accel Energy, which will own its high-emission coal and gas-fired power plants.

AGL acknowledges that it was late for the environmental push.

AGL chairman Peter Botten said on Thursday that the two split companies would submit their climate reports to a non-binding shareholder advisory vote at their first annual general meetings.

If the split did not take place, he said, AGL would hold the same vote at its 2022 meeting.

“The proposed new entities will each publish detailed climate change roadmaps, including specific decarbonization targets showing clear progress against our existing emissions reduction trajectory,” Botten said.

So-called “Say on Climate” votes are increasingly adopted in the Australian energy and resources sector.

Oil Search, Rio Tinto, Santos and Woodside have also pledged to hold such votes from 2022.

AGL’s announcement comes a day after the Australasian Center for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR), an activist shareholder group, tabled a resolution ahead of AGL’s next annual meeting in September demanding disclosure of how the split companies proposed emission reduction targets and future spending plans were in line with the Paris agreement target of limiting the rise in global temperatures to well below 2 degrees.

Dan Gocher, chief climate officer of ACCR, welcomed AGL’s commitment to ‘Say on Climate’ votes, but said investors would be skeptical of the company’s commitment to the vote. of climate action until it commits to achieving the objectives aligned with Paris for its direct emissions and the emissions of its customers.

“AGL has not presented a viable transition plan to its shareholders, but is instead trying to quarantine what are likely stranded assets in Accel Energy,” he said.

“To provide investors with the confidence they so badly need, it is imperative that AGL provide a climate transition plan aligned with Paris for the two proposed entities, with short, medium and long term objectives, an alignment of investment and a remuneration framework that encourages accelerating decarbonization.

Shares of the company rose 0.8% to $ 7.98 on Thursday.

The company has lost about a third of its value so far this year and has fallen steadily for the past four years since peaking at $ 28,187 in April 2017.


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Texas cat Osterman strikes at 9, USA leads Italy in softball at Olympics – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://const-japan.com/texas-cat-osterman-strikes-at-9-usa-leads-italy-in-softball-at-olympics-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 09:34:46 +0000 https://const-japan.com/texas-cat-osterman-strikes-at-9-usa-leads-italy-in-softball-at-olympics-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Cat Osterman looked forward, not back, as the United States began its quest to regain the Olympic softball gold, 13 years after losing the championship game. A 38-year-old southpaw and one of the two remaining players from 2008, Osterman threw a six-innings and nine innings to beat Italy 2-0 on Wednesday in scorching heat and […]]]>

Cat Osterman looked forward, not back, as the United States began its quest to regain the Olympic softball gold, 13 years after losing the championship game.

A 38-year-old southpaw and one of the two remaining players from 2008, Osterman threw a six-innings and nine innings to beat Italy 2-0 on Wednesday in scorching heat and withered humidity as the Olympic Games were starting.

“Today was today,” she said. “If I use ’08 as a motivation, then I’m selfish. It’s not about me. It is not a silver medal that happened. It’s about this team and allowing these athletes younger than me to live an Olympic dream and hopefully reach the top step of the podium. So today’s day was totally dedicated to how we are going to beat Italy and how am I going to help this team get started.

Michelle Moultrie scored a single run in the fourth inning for the top-ranked United States, who lost the title to Japan 3-1 at the 2008 Beijing Games. Janie Reed, wife of Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Jake Reed, added a sacrifice fly in the fifth.

“There’s a lot going on just trying to get into the rhythm of: I’ve always done this. It’s the same game I’ve always played, ”said Moultrie, a 31-year-old outfielder who joined the national team in 2011.

Osterman walked none, hit two batters and gave his only hit to Andrea Filler, a single leading in the fourth. The last remaining player of the 2004 gold medalists and throwing two and a half months before her scheduled retirement, Osterman improved to 6-1 in Olympic play with 66 strikeouts in 38 innings.

“The body does not recover as quickly,” she said. “Coachie likes to remind me sometimes that I’m not that flexible so I have to adjust my throws a bit. But I think the most important thing is my mentality and my competitiveness has remained the same. “

Monica Abbott, a 35-year-old southpaw who relieved in the 2008 gold medal game, struck out the side in the seventh for the save. She could start Thursday morning’s game against Canada, which is part of a series of Olympics played without supporters.

“It’s kind of sad that there can’t be spectators, especially foreign spectators,” Abbott said. “It’s an event that doesn’t happen all the time, so it’s disappointing not to have people in the stands – but also not to have Japanese fans when Japan is such a softball-loving country. . “

The players sweated pounds on the artificial turf.

“We trained in Midland, Texas where the turf was 150 degrees,” said US coach Ken Eriksen. “So we are ready for Fukushima at 145 degrees.”

Loser Greta Cecchetti, a Texas A&M Corpus Christi pitcher, allowed two runs and four hits in four or more innings.

Valerie Arioto led the fourth with an inside shot to the middle, beating second baseman Andrea Filler’s throw. Ali Aguilar sacrificed and Moultrie scored a single on the artificial turf in front of Filler and into right field, sending Arioto slipping through the plate.

Alexia Lacatena, an 18-year-old from Stanhope, New Jersey, who will pitch for the University of Kentucky next spring, was relieved and allowed a sacrifice to Reed, whose husband made his league debut on July 6. and played six matches. before being optioned Tuesday at Triple-A in Oklahoma City.

Italy’s last nine hitters were called out in order.

“In 2008, we didn’t have a bad tournament,” said Osterman. “We just had a game that didn’t go our way.”

JAPAN 8, AUSTRALIA 1

Yukiko Ueno calmed down after a shaky start to allow two hits in 4 1/3 innings with seven strikeouts, and host Japan beat Australia in the first event of the Olympics.

Ueno, 39, defeated the United States in the 2008 gold medal game.

Minori Naito and Saki Yamazaki hit two-run homers against loser Kaia Parnaby, and Yu Yamamoto, who had three RBIs, added a two-run drive against Tarni Stepto in the fifth which ended the game under one. rout rule.

CANADA 4, MEXICO 0

Sara Groenewegen was called out after four innings without a hitting from a double combined hitter, and Jenn Salling produced two runs.

Groenewegen, the 2015 Big Ten Player of the Year and two-time Big Ten Pitcher of the Year in Minnesota, struck out three strikes and walked one for the win. She was withdrawn after 54 throws.

Jenna Caira, who played for Syracuse, allowed Suzannah Brookshire’s single to enter the shortstop hole with a fifth out. Danielle Lawrie, the 34-year-old sister of former major league infielder Brett Lawrie, finished off both hitters, giving up Tatyana Forbes’ single on a helicopter down the right side before the sixth.

Kaleigh Rafter and Salling had RBI singles in the first loser Dallas Escobedo, and Salling’s home run made it 3-0 in the third. Kelsey Harshman, who played for Wisconsin, added a single with a 0-2 score in the fourth.

Escobedo allowed four runs, seven hits and five walks in four innings for Mexico, who made their Olympic softball debut.


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As record heat threatens Tokyo Olympics, here’s what climate change means for future sporting events https://const-japan.com/as-record-heat-threatens-tokyo-olympics-heres-what-climate-change-means-for-future-sporting-events/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 15:28:34 +0000 https://const-japan.com/as-record-heat-threatens-tokyo-olympics-heres-what-climate-change-means-for-future-sporting-events/ Top line In addition to the threat of Covid-19, athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will also face the dangers of extreme heat, as soaring temperatures in the Japanese capital, spurred by climate change, are expected to make the Games this year’s hottest ever. Hot Tokyo conditions could be potentially dangerous for athletes. […]]]>

Top line

In addition to the threat of Covid-19, athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will also face the dangers of extreme heat, as soaring temperatures in the Japanese capital, spurred by climate change, are expected to make the Games this year’s hottest ever.

Highlights

This year’s Summer Olympics are expected to be some of the hottest ever, with maximum temperatures expected to average around 30 degrees Celsius, or close to 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

Combined with the sweltering humidity of Tokyo, the dangerous conditions – which have prompted the government to warn residents against exercising outdoors – hamper performance and expose athletes to heat-related conditions like beating. heat, dehydration and burns, with beach volleyball players already complaining that the sand is too hot to play on.

The problem was not unforeseen for organizers, who made the decision to change event schedules and move marathon and walking events out of Tokyo in an attempt to avoid the heat, but is becoming a more pressing issue for all sporting events because climate change is raising temperatures. .

Outside of the Olympics, major tennis and football tournaments had to put in place policies to protect players from the extreme heat, triathlons and horse races in the United States were canceled due to heat waves and the world’s biggest sporting event, the FIFA World Cup, will take place in air-conditioned stadiums to avoid the worst heat of host country Qatar in 2022.

The effects of climate change are not limited to the extreme heat: the shortening of the winter seasons poses an existential threat to snow sports, severe typhoons have resulted in the cancellation of several matches of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the smoke from forest fires has disrupted many outdoor events in the United States and Australia.

Crucial quote

The International Olympic Committee declared Forbes he “takes heat concerns very seriously” and has taken a “wide range of measures” to mitigate the effect of temperature on athletes. These measures include scheduling long distance athletics and cycling events later in the day, moving horse riding and triathlon events to early mornings, and improving access to shade and at the water.

Key context

The Tokyo Medical Association pointed out that holding the games in July and August was “a serious problem even before the coronavirus pandemic” and a report by the British Association for Sustainable Sport highlighted the likelihood of impaired performance due to heat. Heat was once a problem before the event – three rowers were treated for heat exhaustion after a test event at the Tokyo Olympics in 2019 – and other sporting events around the world are increasingly encountering more similar problems. 28 of the 68 starters withdrew from a World Championships marathon held in Doha, Qatar in 2019 due to conditions, with one runner being taken in an ambulance. The race started at midnight in an attempt to avoid the worst of Qatar’s heat.

Large number

71,000. This is the number of people who requested emergency treatment for heat stroke between June and September 2019 in Japan. 118 of them died. A smaller number – 65,000 cases and 112 deaths – occurred during the same time frame in 2020, although fewer people were released due to the pandemic.

What to watch out for

Qatar’s cooled stadiums for the 2022 World Cup will likely provide some insight into how outdoor sporting events can be staged in hot weather, especially if its cooling technology is both environmentally friendly and efficient. The event should be carbon neutral, just like the next Summer and Winter Olympics, ”said the IOC Forbes. Paris 2024 should be the first “positive climate” games.

Further reading

Tokyo Olympics: Fears athletes face hottest Games on record (Guardian)

Races canceled, players passed out: Climate change puts pressure on sport (Reuters)

Playing against the clock: Global sport, the climate emergency and the case for rapid change (Rapid Transition Alliance)


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Japan goes nuclear to stay calm during Summer Olympics https://const-japan.com/japan-goes-nuclear-to-stay-calm-during-summer-olympics/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 09:46:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-goes-nuclear-to-stay-calm-during-summer-olympics/ Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Preview – Tokyo, Japan – July 19, 2021 A woman shelters from the sun under an umbrella as she walks past Olympic Games signage REUTERS / Thomas Peter / File Photo Nuclear restarts are accelerating Meteorological office issues heatstroke warnings Japan wants to avoid a repeat of the winter crisis TOKYO, […]]]>

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Preview – Tokyo, Japan – July 19, 2021 A woman shelters from the sun under an umbrella as she walks past Olympic Games signage REUTERS / Thomas Peter / File Photo

  • Nuclear restarts are accelerating
  • Meteorological office issues heatstroke warnings
  • Japan wants to avoid a repeat of the winter crisis

TOKYO, July 20 (Reuters) – Japan has restarted additional power plants, including a long-dormant nuclear reactor, and taken other steps to avert an energy crisis as temperatures soar and demand for cooling surges, especially in Tokyo, where the Olympics begin on Friday.

With the world’s eyes on Tokyo as it hosts the Summer Games amid concerns over the risks posed by the coronavirus pandemic, Japan wants to prevent the electricity crisis experienced during the winter from happening again , when power companies urged customers to ration usage to avoid power outages. Read more

Earlier this month, Kansai Electric Power (9503.T) restarted another reactor, the fifth to be restarted in Japan since January, including a 44-year-old unit that had been shut down for ten years.

Japan has nine reactors in operation, the highest number since the Fukushima atomic disaster that shut down Japan’s nuclear industry. Read more

A gas-fired power station and a coal-fired power station were also commissioned earlier than expected.

The increase in production capacity gave the Ministry of Industry assurance that the electricity supply would be sufficient.

“We are not worried about the electricity supply during the summer as the restarts of additional power plants have increased the capacity,” Yuri Ito, deputy director of the ministry’s electricity supply policy office, told Reuters. Of the industry.

Japan’s electricity grid faced periods of intense stress in the decade following the Fukushima disaster, and the government introduced more competition to the sector and more renewables into the mix.

But Japan still relies heavily on fossil fuels, especially liquefied natural gas (LNG) and coal, which must be imported.

Adding to the pressures on the sector, many old petroleum and coal-fired power plants are closed in Japan as liberalization forces cost reductions, and the pressure to reduce CO2 emissions makes them unsustainable.

The Industry Ministry warned in May of the risk of power cuts during peak summer demand and asked utilities to guarantee adequate production capacity as well as LNG stocks.

LNG stocks stood at around 2 million tonnes at the end of June, about 100,000 tonnes more than the average for the past four years, Ito said.

As the summer wore on, some tightening in supply was evident as spot electricity prices for the Tokyo area doubled this month.

On Tuesday, the country’s meteorological office issued heatstroke alerts for the fourth day in a row. At noon, the temperature in Tokyo was 34 degrees Celsius, and there is a forecast for a hotter-than-usual summer.

The Japanese Grid Monitor (OCCTO) estimates excess generation capacity in the Tokyo area at 5% for July and 3.9% for August. Excess capacity of less than 3% could lead to supply shortages and possibly even blackouts.

OCCTO has launched a new monitoring program using LNG inventory data from major producers to assess the amount of electricity supply that might be available during peak demand periods and help anticipate fuel shortages.

“It’s still a testing phase, but we want to improve its accuracy and clarity before the more serious winter season,” said an OCCTO official.

Reporting by Yuka Obayashi; Written by Aaron Sheldrick; Editing by Gavin Maguire and Simon Cameron-Moore

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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What you need to know for 2021 – NBC Chicago https://const-japan.com/what-you-need-to-know-for-2021-nbc-chicago/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 17:38:08 +0000 https://const-japan.com/what-you-need-to-know-for-2021-nbc-chicago/ The Tokyo Olympics arrived after a one-year postponement due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Olympic football, which was first introduced at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, can be one of the most fun and entertaining events of the Games. The US men’s soccer team failed to qualify for the 2020 Summer Olympics for the third […]]]>

The Tokyo Olympics arrived after a one-year postponement due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Olympic football, which was first introduced at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, can be one of the most fun and entertaining events of the Games.

The US men’s soccer team failed to qualify for the 2020 Summer Olympics for the third time in a row and have missed four of the last five Games. Fortunately, the United States’ national women’s football team are the reigning FIFA World Cup champions and the favorite to win their fifth gold in Tokyo.

There is so much to look forward to this summer, so here’s everything you need to know about Olympic soccer.

What are the rules of Olympic football?

Same as regular soccer: each team has 11 players, 10 outfielders and a goalie. A match consists of two 45-minute periods with a 15-minute half-time.

When are the men’s and women’s Olympic football tournaments held?

Olympic football tournaments traditionally start before the Opening Ceremony, and this year is no different.

The US women’s team competes in Group G. They will face Sweden at 4:30 am ET on Wednesday, July 21. The United States will next face New Zealand at 7:30 a.m. ET on July 24 and close out the group stage at 4 a.m. on July 27 against Australia.

The knockout stage begins on June 30 and ends in Tokyo for the gold medal match on August 6.

The men’s Olympic tournament kicks off at 3:30 a.m. ET on July 22 and the group stage continues on July 25 and 28. The knockout phase will begin at 4 a.m. ET on July 31 and conclude at Yokohama International Stadium for the gold medal game. August 7.

Where are the Olympic football tournaments held?

A total of seven venues will be used for the men’s and women’s Olympic soccer teams.

The US women’s team will play their group matches in three different stadiums: first at Tokyo Stadium; then at Saitama Stadium, located about 30 kilometers north of Tokyo; and finally at Ibaraki Kashima Stadium in Kashima, which is on the Japanese coast about 70 miles northeast of Tokyo.

Other cities that will host tournaments during the games are Chofu, Yokohama and Rifu.

Who is on the United States National Women’s Football Team?

Goalkeepers (2): Adrianna Franch (Portland Thorns FC), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars)

Defenders (6): Abby Dahlkemper (Manchester City / ENG), Tierna Davidson (Chicago Red Stars), Crystal Dunn (Portland Thorns FC), Kelley O’Hara (Washington Spirit), Becky Sauerbrunn (Portland Thorns FC), Emily Sonnett ( Spirit of Washington)

Midfielder (5): Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC), Rose Lavelle (OL Reign), Kristie Mewis (Houston Dash), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage)

Forwards (5): Tobin Heath (Unattached), Carli Lloyd (NJ / NY Gotham FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), Christen Press (Unattached), Megan Rapinoe (OL Reign)

What are the groups for the Olympic football tournaments in 2021?

Sixteen teams will face off in the men’s tournament and so far there is no clear favorite for the Tokyo Games. Brazil won the most recent gold medal in Rio.

Of the 12 teams in the women’s draw, the United States – which leads the FIFA world rankings – are the favorites to win their fifth gold after failing to win a medal in 2016 after a disappointing loss to the Sweden.

Men’s draw

Group A: Japan, South Africa, Mexico, France

Group B: New Zealand, South Korea, Honduras, Romania

Group C: Egypt, Spain, Argentina, Australia

Group D: Brazil, Germany, Ivory Coast, Saudi Arabia

Women’s draw

Group E: Japan, Canada, Great Britain, Chile

Group F: China, Brazil, Zambia, Netherlands

Group G: Sweden, United States, Australia, New Zealand

How is the Olympic football tournament different from the FIFA World Cup?

For starters, there are 32 teams at the Men’s World Cup, and the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup will also have 32 teams (up from 24 in 2019).

Countries participating in the World Cup send rosters of 23 players, but only 18 players are allowed on a team roster at the Olympics.

Unlike the Olympics, the World Cup has the option of hosting its women’s tournament one calendar year after the men’s tournament, so there is no interference with the audience.

There are no age restrictions at the Men’s or Women’s World Cup or in the women’s teams at the Olympic Games. However, men’s teams at the Olympics must have at least 20 players aged 23 or under, with only three players allowed to be over 23.

FIFA has announced that it will use the same eligibility criteria for the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 that it intends to use in 2020: players born on or after January 1, 1997 are eligible, plus three age exceptions. Therefore, players born in 1997 will not be disqualified due to the postponement of the Olympics for one year.


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FirstFT: OPEC and its allies reach agreement to increase oil production https://const-japan.com/firstft-opec-and-its-allies-reach-agreement-to-increase-oil-production/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 22:39:57 +0000 https://const-japan.com/firstft-opec-and-its-allies-reach-agreement-to-increase-oil-production/ Hello. This article is an on-site version of our FirstFT newsletter. Subscribe to our Asia, Europe / Africa or Americas edition to receive it directly to your inbox every morning of the week Did you follow the news well this week? Take our quiz. Opec and its allies have reached an agreement to increase oil […]]]>

Hello. This article is an on-site version of our FirstFT newsletter. Subscribe to our Asia, Europe / Africa or Americas edition to receive it directly to your inbox every morning of the week

Did you follow the news well this week? Take our quiz.

Opec and its allies have reached an agreement to increase oil production in response to the spike in prices, and set a goal for the end of 2022 to restore all production cut during the first days of the pandemic.

Initially, Opec + will pump an additional 400,000 barrels per day each month from August, increasing production by about 2 million barrels per day in total by the end of the year.

These monthly production increases will continue next year, with Opec + claiming to have extended the deal until December 2022 from April 2022. The outcome of the long-delayed meeting is expected to mean higher oil production from members. in the coming months, after the supply pushed oil prices to the highest level in three years.

But the modest pace of increased production is a sign of continued concern about the strength of the global recovery as variants of Covid-19 continue to emerge. It also suggests that oil producers are relatively comfortable with the current price of crude.

Five other articles in the news

1. The Delta variant settles in developing countries The Delta coronavirus variant, which has quickly become dominant in much of the world, is taking a heavy toll on dozens of developing countries, where immunization levels are insufficient to prevent an increase in cases from becoming a wave of deaths .

2. Pentagon drones “8 to 14 times” more expensive than banned Chinese devices
Camera drones developed by the Pentagon are more expensive and less efficient than the Chinese-made ones they were supposed to replace, according to an internal US government memo seen by the Financial Times.

3. The pandemic robs Asian garment workers of nearly $ 12 billion in wages
Asian garment workers have been deprived of nearly $ 12 billion in wages and severance pay as international retailers canceled orders and demanded price cuts in the wake of the pandemic, advocacy group says labor rights.

4. China markets the remains of the Angbang empire Anbang’s remains in China were valued at more than $ 5.2 billion in state controllers’ latest attempt to disband the once high-profile group led by jailed tycoon Wu Xiaohui.

5. Tokyo Stock Exchange chief defends progress in corporate governance Tokyo Stock Exchange chairman defended Japan’s progress on corporate governance following a high-profile scandal at Toshiba, dismissing accusations that the market overhaul scheduled for next year has been largely watered down .

Coronavirus digest

Register now for our Coronavirus Business Update newsletter for more Covid-19 news and follow the latest developments on our live blog.

The day to come

Earnings IBM will release its results today after the US markets close.

Reopening day in isolation British Prime Minister Boris Johnson began self-isolating on Sunday 10 days after coming into contact with his Minister of Health, Sajid Javid, who tested positive for Covid-19. Johnson is still moving forward with his reopening plan which goes into effect today.

What else do we read

Olympic hope A 21-year-old Japanese swimmer has established himself as a rallying point for the organizers of the 2021 Olympics. Rikako Ikei, who was due to miss the 2020 Olympics due to a battle with leukemia, has the chance to attend postponed matches and generate excitement for the polarizing event.

  • Notice: Japan’s battle against “blatant rule violation” at the 2021 Olympics is hampered by the government’s lack of credibility, writes Leo Lewis.

Rikako Ikei, who was diagnosed with leukemia in 2019, at the Japan National Swimming Championships in April 2021 © Charly Triballeau / AFP via Getty Images

Floods push climate to the heart of German elections With just over two months to go to election day, the devastating floods that swept through western Germany this week catapulted climate change to the heart of the country’s election campaign.

Inflationary fears are exaggerated The first signs of price increases reflect more of a predictable increase in animal spirits after the lockdown than any long-term trend, writes Rana Foroohar.

© Matt Kenyon

Poor workers have nowhere to hide Do mediocre workers thrive more when they work from home or when they are in the office? While some employers doubt the motivations of staff who prefer remote work, some argue that it’s easier to identify staff who add the most value when a team is working remotely.

Food drink

How Eritrean cuisine came to Leeds Six young women who fled their country as children share recipes from home.

Elsa Asmara is holding a dish of gomen besiga © Maryam Wahid

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Japan and Guatemala affirm their cooperation in maintaining international order https://const-japan.com/japan-and-guatemala-affirm-their-cooperation-in-maintaining-international-order/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 02:33:34 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japan-and-guatemala-affirm-their-cooperation-in-maintaining-international-order/ Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi and Guatemalan Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo meet on July 16, 2021 in Guatemala City. (Photo courtesy Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Kyodo) TOKYO (Kyodo) – Foreign ministers of Japan and Guatemala, which maintains diplomatic relations with Taiwan, agreed at a meeting in Guatemala City on Friday to cooperate in […]]]>

Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi and Guatemalan Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo meet on July 16, 2021 in Guatemala City. (Photo courtesy Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Kyodo)

TOKYO (Kyodo) – Foreign ministers of Japan and Guatemala, which maintains diplomatic relations with Taiwan, agreed at a meeting in Guatemala City on Friday to cooperate in maintaining an open and evidence-based international order. rules as tensions continue to mount across the Taiwan Strait. .

Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi’s meeting with his Guatemalan counterpart Pedro Brolo came as China increased its influence through COVID-19 vaccine diplomacy and infrastructure investments with Central American countries and countries. Caribbean. Guatemala and eight other countries in the region maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan.

Communist China and democratic Taiwan have been governed separately since their separation in 1949 following a civil war. Beijing sees Taiwan as a renegade province awaiting reunification, by force if necessary.

“I hope to further strengthen the bilateral partnership with Guatemala,” which shares universal values ​​such as the rule of law, democracy and respect for human rights, Motegi said at the start of the meeting.

Motegi later said in a joint press conference that he and Brolo shared the view that strengthening their countries’ ties is important, especially when the international balance of power is rapidly changing and becoming more complex.

Brolo told the press conference that Japan-Guatemala relations are strategic and there is room for growth in bilateral trade.

Motegi also announced the provision of $ 2.8 million in emergency aid to Guatemala to help it rebuild after damage from the hurricane last year.

The Japanese minister also met with foreign ministers from the Central American Integration System – a regional bloc of eight countries that aims to boost economic integration – of which Guatemala currently holds the rotating presidency.

The ministers, some of whom participated remotely, discussed the pandemic response, disaster reduction, poverty and climate change, Japan’s foreign ministry said.

Members of the bloc have shown understanding for the Japanese government’s decision to release treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant into the Pacific Ocean, according to the ministry.

In a separate meeting in Guatemala City, Salvadoran Foreign Minister Alexandra Hill told Motegi the country was eager to deepen ties with Japan to resolve global issues and thanked the Asian country for its support in the areas of poverty, public security, infrastructure development and human resource development. .

Motegi had telephone conversations with Rodolfo Solano, Costa Rican Minister of Foreign Affairs and Worship, who thanked Japan for its help in measures to combat the coronavirus, including the provision of medical equipment.

The Japanese minister will also visit Panama and Jamaica before returning to Japan. His planned trip to Cuba on Monday was canceled, Cuban and Japanese officials said. Recently there have been a series of anti-government protests in Cuba.

The latest tour follows Motegi’s visits in January to Latin American countries Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Paraguay and Uruguay.

His visit to Guatemala marked the first such trip to the country by a Japanese foreign minister in 34 years, the Japanese ministry said.


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First resident of Olympic Village tested positive for COVID – NBC Chicago https://const-japan.com/first-resident-of-olympic-village-tested-positive-for-covid-nbc-chicago/ Sat, 17 Jul 2021 06:28:23 +0000 https://const-japan.com/first-resident-of-olympic-village-tested-positive-for-covid-nbc-chicago/ The first resident of the Olympic Village has tested positive for COVID-19, organizers of the Tokyo Olympics announced on Saturday. Officials said he was not an athlete with the Games opening in just under a week on July 23. Tokyo officials, including Seiko Hashimoto, the chair of the organizing committee, confirmed the case and said […]]]>

The first resident of the Olympic Village has tested positive for COVID-19, organizers of the Tokyo Olympics announced on Saturday.

Officials said he was not an athlete with the Games opening in just under a week on July 23.

Tokyo officials, including Seiko Hashimoto, the chair of the organizing committee, confirmed the case and said the positive test took place on Friday. The organizers state, for reasons of confidentiality, that they can offer only a vague description and few details.

“In the current situation, for positive cases to arise is something we have to assume possible,” said Toshiro Muto, CEO of the Tokyo Organizing Committee.

The person is simply identified as “Gaming personnel”. The person is also listed as a non-resident of Japan. Tokyo officials said the person has been placed in a 14-day quarantine.

The Tokyo Bay Olympic Village will be home to approximately 11,000 athletes during the Olympic Games and thousands of other staff.

IOC President Thomas Bach said this week that there was no risk of athletes in the village spreading the virus to Japanese or other village residents.

Organizers say that since July 1 and Saturday, 44 people under their “jurisdiction” have tested positive. None involved people living in the village and most are identified as “contractors” for Tokyo 2020 and “staff involved in the games”. The list includes an athlete – who tested positive on July 14 – and three members of the media.

Of the 44, only 12 are listed as “non-residents of Japan”.

Organizers say athletes and staff who were absent from Tokyo during training camps are excluded from this list and from their accounts.

Tokyo officials said they could not give an estimate of the number of people in the village on Saturday.

On Friday in Tokyo, 1,271 new cases of COVID-19 were reported. They were 822 a week ago, and this marks the 27th day in a row that cases were higher than a week earlier. As of Thursday, new cases were reported at 1,308, the highest in six months.

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More AP: https://apnews.com/hub/olympic-games and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports



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