Japan climate – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 16:40:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://const-japan.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T131502.299-150x150.png Japan climate – Const Japan http://const-japan.com/ 32 32 How the Wizards are preparing for their trip to Japan https://const-japan.com/how-the-wizards-are-preparing-for-their-trip-to-japan/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 15:33:21 +0000 https://const-japan.com/how-the-wizards-are-preparing-for-their-trip-to-japan/ Although he’s not exactly economy class when he travels, Kristaps Porzingis may be the only 7-foot-3 person you won’t hear complaining about long flights. No WiFi on the plane? Not a problem for the Washington Wizards big man. He prefers to sip coffee and grind through his to-do list without distraction. “That’s when I’m most […]]]>

Although he’s not exactly economy class when he travels, Kristaps Porzingis may be the only 7-foot-3 person you won’t hear complaining about long flights.

No WiFi on the plane? Not a problem for the Washington Wizards big man. He prefers to sip coffee and grind through his to-do list without distraction.

“That’s when I’m most productive,” Porzingis said this week, mimicking typing on a cellphone. “I go through my notes, I delete that, I do everything. I organize my life.

Porzingis will have plenty of time to get organized when the Wizards fly to Japan this week for a pair of preseason games against the Golden State Warriors on Friday and Sunday. The team’s charter flight takes off from Dulles International Airport at 2:00 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday and is scheduled to land just after 5:00 p.m. in Japan on Wednesday, which means Porzingis, his teammates and the rest of the organization’s travel group of about 100 people will spend more than 14 hours of flight.

Yes, wizards are better. But so is the Eastern Conference.

Spending so much time indoors and breathing recycled air is painful for everyone. For Wizards players, how they weather the dehydration, disrupted sleep and jet lag that come with air travel could make a difference on the field – both in Japan and, more importantly, when they get to home and play two more pre-season games before the start of the season. . The quality of their trips is a matter of competitive advantage.

That’s why Sue Saunders Bouvier, who is a nutritionist for the Wizards, Mystics and Nationals, and Mark Simpson, vice president of player performance for Monumental Sports, worked for months to plan Washington’s trip to a T.

“We gave specific guidance on when to put on their masks during the flight,” Simpson said.

The overriding message that Saunders Bouvier and Simpson told the players is not to adapt. Wizards are only on the ground in Japan for four full days, so any attempt to get on Japan’s time will do more damage than good on the other side of the trip.

To help Washington players trick their bodies into thinking they’re still on DC time, Simpson provided everyone with an infographic that details when, exactly, during a 14-hour flight they should get up to stretch, eat their meals, open the shade on a window seat and try to rest. The team consulted with sleep specialist Chris Winter to determine the amount of sleep needed. Prior to what Simpson and Winter have determined to be the players’ ideal bedtime, the team will serve foods that promote sleep and lower the temperature in the airplane cabin.

“There’s a certain set of variables — we call them zeitgebers — that our brain uses to determine where we are in time,” Winter said. “Light, meal times, social interaction, exercise…it’s really about thinking about those kind of sensory inputs and manipulating them so that the brain doesn’t really feel like it’s ever been to Tokyo.”

Bradley Beal was there for John Wall when he needed it most

Meal planning from Saunders Bouvier can help.

A successful journey, from a nutritional point of view, begins as soon as the players board. Players will now be surrounded by food to ensure their bodies are adequately fueled both on the long flight and on the long bus rides the team will have once they land in Tokyo. Saitama Super Arena, where the matches are held, is about 25 miles away in traffic from Tokyo.

“The theme of this trip is ‘snacks on a plane’,” said Saunders Bouvier, whose planning began five months ago with the simple question ‘Is there Gatorade in Japan?’ (No, but there are alternatives.)

Saunders Bouvier tries to keep everything except sports drinks.

“It’s very routine. It’s not just the time you eat the meal, it’s the composition of your meal — it’s a bit Pavlovian,” she said. “Having breakfast at dinner time can actually work in Japan because it’s dinner time in Washington, DC, and having a little tastier breakfast that coincides with when we usually eat dinner, these are things that reduce the disruption of being on a completely reverse clock for seven days.

Think steak and eggs for breakfast instead of just scrambled eggs and pancakes instead of rice as the starch for dinner. But speaking of carbs, pay attention to those. Too many people at dinner during the flight will energize the body and may disturb sleep. Saunders Bouvier encourages players to eat a protein-rich meal before resting and offers enough options – lobster, shrimp, steak, chicken and vegan choices – that anyone wants to skip the rolls altogether.

But even with the meticulous planning of all the support staff, not everything is under their control. Players and coaches will pass the time on the plane however they choose, whether it’s Porzingis emptying his inbox or veteran forward Taj Gibson’s favorite way to pass the time.

Gibson, 37, doesn’t sleep as well on airplanes anymore. But he has a plan for it.

“You can open some wine, get comfortable, and start telling stories,” Gibson said with a smile. “It’s the whole process of being on the plane. Make yourself comfortable, because we’re going to see each other a lot.

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Climate relief cannot wait for utopia https://const-japan.com/climate-relief-cannot-wait-for-utopia/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/climate-relief-cannot-wait-for-utopia/ Since the 1960s, fighting for the environment has often meant fighting against corporations. To fight pollution, activists have worked to thwart new oil drilling, coal-fired power plants, fracking for natural gas and oil pipelines. But today, Americans face a climate challenge that cannot be solved by simply saying no over and over again. Decarbonizing the […]]]>

Since the 1960s, fighting for the environment has often meant fighting against corporations. To fight pollution, activists have worked to thwart new oil drilling, coal-fired power plants, fracking for natural gas and oil pipelines. But today, Americans face a climate challenge that cannot be solved by simply saying no over and over again.

Decarbonizing the economy will require an unprecedented amount of new energy investment. Fossil fuel infrastructure built over centuries must be replaced over the coming decades with clean energy alternatives. The United States will have to build hundreds of thousands of square miles of wind and solar farms; deploy enough battery storage to keep power flowing through the grid even on calm, cloudy days; and at least double the capacity of the country’s transmission lines. And the same laws that environmental groups have used in the past to block or delay fossil fuel projects are now being exploited by NIMBYs in ways that, however well-intentioned, will slow the country’s transition to clean energy. . Windmills off Cape Cod, a geothermal facility in Nevada and what could have been America’s largest solar farm have all been stymied by an endless series of environmental reviews and lawsuits.

The good news is that with sensible reforms, the energy transition is within reach. Private investment in clean energy technologies is skyrocketing, and even Big Oil is beginning to realize that there is no future in fossil fuels.

But that may not be enough for some environmentalists. Jamie Henn, environmental activist and director of Fossil Free Media, recently said rolling stone“Look, I want to take carbon out of the atmosphere, but this is such an opportunity to remake our society. But if we just perpetuate the same misdeeds in a clean energy economy, and that’s just a world of Exxons and Elon Musks, oh man, what a nightmare. Many progressive commentators agree that tackling climate change requires a fundamental reorganization of the West’s political and economic systems.” level of disruption required to keep us below ‘absolutely catastrophic’ temperature is fundamentally, at a deep structural level, incompatible with the status quo,” writer Phil McDuff explained. The Climate Crisis, the climate crisis lawyer insisted Green New Deal Naomi Klein, ‘might be the best argument progressives have ever had’ to roll back corporate influence, tear up free trade deals and reinvest in public services and infrastructure.

Such comments raise a question: what is the real goal here: to stop climate change or to abolish capitalism? Taking climate change seriously as a global emergency requires an all-on-deck attitude and a recognition that technological solutions (yes, often built and deployed by private companies) can deliver real decarbonization progress before the proletariat seizes the means of production. A massive injection of private investment, made not for charitable purposes but in anticipation of future profits, is precisely what is needed to accelerate the transition to clean energy, which, like all revolutions, will yield unpredictable results. .

The belief that top-down decision makers can choreograph precisely how the clean energy revolution will unfold runs deep in progressive circles. In the manifesto outlining his version of the Green New Deal, Bernie Sanders said: “To achieve our goal of 100% sustainable energy, we will not rely on any false solutions such as nuclear, geo-engineering, capture and carbon sequestration or waste incinerators. Many environmental groups share the Vermont senator’s dislike of these technologies. But the climate emergency demands that we take a closer look at some of them before canceling them altogether. In the face of uncertainty about the best path to decarbonization, policymakers should think like a venture capitalist, placing many bets in the hope that some technologies will fail but the investment portfolio will succeed in its own right. together. The “false solutions” denounced by Sanders could indeed prove to be unachievable. Nuclear energy may never be cost-competitive and geo-engineering may prove technically unfeasible. But we cannot know in advance.

Environmental activists have always been skeptical of nuclear power, but that attitude may be changing. California reversed its decision to shut down the Diablo Canyon plant and Japan announced plans to resume investing in nuclear power, an outcome few expected after Fukushima. This is good news, given that, per unit of electricity generated, nuclear power causes fewer deaths than wind power and creates less carbon emissions than solar (and waste concerns are exaggerated). However, a major barrier to deployment remains: unlike solar and wind, which have seen dramatic cost declines, the construction costs of nuclear power plants have actually increased over time. While this means the current generation of nuclear technology is unlikely to be a major climate tool, advanced nuclear systems such as small modular reactors hold great promise. The potential climate benefits of cost-effective nuclear fission or even nuclear fusion are so great that they are worth strategic bets, even in the long term.

Some forms of geoengineering, such as carbon dioxide removal, would require massive cost reductions to be viable as a climate solution. But the same was true for solar and wind decades ago, and the government was able to accelerate the learning curve in these areas by being an early source of demand and reducing direct costs to consumers. Many progressive environmentalists feel uncomfortable with technologies that lessen the climate impact of fossil fuels rather than banishing them altogether. And yet, we need such options. Some major industries, such as aviation and cement and steel production, will be difficult to decarbonise, and we are already likely to exceed the target of limiting warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. . The only way to permanently reverse this warming will be to suck the carbon straight out of the atmosphere. More traditional carbon capture and sequestration methods, designed to capture greenhouse gases when they are generated by large sources of pollution, are less promising than carbon dioxide removal since they leave usually residual emissions, but they are certainly better than unmitigated. the use of fossil fuels.

In various other ways, Americans will have to choose between the perfect and the good. Some environmentalists are skeptical of geothermal energy, which requires extensive drilling. Still, it has high potential as a clean baseload power source with a small geographic footprint that can, in theory, be deployed anywhere in the world (if you drill deep enough). One way to accelerate investments in geothermal energy would be to give this clean technology the same expedited permit that oil and gas companies already receive for leases on federal lands.

Yet allowing reform requires a relaxation of regulations and laws dear to many environmentalists. The National Environmental Policy Act mandates reviews that give enormous power to anyone who wants to block or delay a proposed energy project, either out of genuine social concern or self-interest. In practice, this is a major bottleneck for building clean energy infrastructure. According to an analysis of government data by the R Street Institute, 65% of energy projects classified as “in progress” or “planned” are related to renewable energy, and 16% relate to electricity transmission. And nearly 20 times more offshore wind power is locked in licensing than is currently in operation or under construction. U.S. climate spending could exceed more than half a trillion dollars by the end of this decade, but without enabling reform, those investments won’t translate into much physical infrastructure. A new permit reform measure proposed by Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia has drawn criticism for accelerating some specific fossil fuel projects, such as the controversial Mountain Valley Pipeline, but in general, clean energy infrastructure has much more to gain. to fossil fuels by streamlining permits, because there is still a lot to build.

None of this means that the United States should let the energy market go wild. On the contrary, the federal government will have to be rigorous to ensure that technologies such as carbon dioxide removal actually deliver on their promises (unlike carbon offsets – a sketchy market rife with fraud and greenwashing). And public investment in clean technologies has already played a vital role in reducing the costs of solar and wind energy as well as batteries.

Yet we cannot succeed in the fight against global warming without giving many alternatives to the status quo the opportunity to evolve and prove themselves. In reality, the false solution to climate change is not geoengineering or nuclear energy, it is the belief that we can only decarbonize the economy by disrupting our economic system, by outright rejecting certain technologies and by rejecting private investment.

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Joint Statement on Blue Pacific Foreign Ministers Meeting Partners https://const-japan.com/joint-statement-on-blue-pacific-foreign-ministers-meeting-partners/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 23:06:16 +0000 https://const-japan.com/joint-statement-on-blue-pacific-foreign-ministers-meeting-partners/ The text of the following declaration was issued by the governments of the United States of America, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom on the occasion of the meeting of Foreign Ministers Blue Pacific Partners on September 22, 2022. start text On September 22, 2022, Ministers and Representatives of Blue Pacific Partners Members […]]]>

The text of the following declaration was issued by the governments of the United States of America, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom on the occasion of the meeting of Foreign Ministers Blue Pacific Partners on September 22, 2022.

start text

On September 22, 2022, Ministers and Representatives of Blue Pacific Partners Members and Observers and Pacific Ministers met to discuss progress on the implementation of Blue Pacific Partners. This follows a Partners in the Blue Pacific briefing with members of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) at senior government level.

Australia, Japan, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States welcomed Germany’s and Canada’s increased attention and commitment to a true partnership with the Pacific and their announcement of their intention to join the Blue Pacific Partners. Partners emphasized that this inclusive and informal mechanism will be guided by the FIP 2050 Strategy for the Pacific Blue Continent and the existing Pacific regional architecture. This included continued engagement and consultation with the PIF and respect for the concept of Pacific regionalism and related regional mechanisms, sovereignty, transparency, accountability, and we are committed to being Pacific island led and guided.

Partners noted that Blue Pacific Partners aim to support the Pacific region and its priorities more effectively and efficiently. Together and individually, our countries will strengthen our current efforts to support Pacific priorities. Together with the PIF and in response to the upcoming Strategy 2050 implementation plan, we will map existing projects and plan for future ones, seeking to generate resources, eliminate duplication and fill gaps, which will will avoid heavier burdens and lost opportunities for the Pacific. governments and peoples of the Pacific. In parallel, each of our governments will continue to increase the ambition of our individual efforts in the region and in alignment with national and regional goals and priorities.

Six forward-looking lines of effort and initial projects for the PBP were discussed, aligned with the thematic areas of the Forum’s 2050 Strategy. The participants agreed to continue the dialogue before finalizing the lines of effort. The lines of effort discussed were:

  • Climate Change Resilience, Adaptation and Disasters
  • Secure and resilient technology and connectivity
  • Protection of the ocean and the environment
  • people centered development
  • Resources and economic development
  • Political leadership and regionalism

Participants discussed some potential initiatives that could be considered initially as part of the Informal and Inclusive Blue Pacific Partners. These included: humanitarian warehousing in the Pacific to pre-position humanitarian and emergency supplies, as agreed by FIP Ministers at the inaugural meeting of Pacific Disaster Risk Reduction Ministers in Nadi; an annual conference on cyber capabilities in the Pacific; additional support to the Pacific Climate Change Center in Samoa; and support to access climate finance. Participants agreed to continue discussions on potential initiatives in 2022 based on preferred Pacific Island timelines.

Next steps

The partners further committed to work with the region to consider other potential initiatives for consultation and review in the Pacific, including in areas such as education and scholarships, infrastructure, gender and control. against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

Partners committed to regular and ongoing engagement with Pacific Island governments, the PIF and other Council of Regional Organizations in the Pacific (CROP) agencies, and periodic engagement to review and guide implementation in partnership with the Pacific in accordance with the views of the Pacific Islands.

Partners are committed to regular and sustained engagement and consultation with members of the Blue Pacific Partners Forum to ensure they are addressing Pacific priorities. Partners have strengthened their long-term commitment to the Pacific and ensured that this informal and inclusive mechanism delivers practical and tangible results aligned with the existing regional architecture and Pacific-led at every step.

*Participants included representatives from Australia, Fiji, French Polynesia, Japan, Kiribati, Nauru, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga , Tuvalu, United Kingdom, the United States and Vanuatu, as well as Canada, France, Germany, India, the Republic of Korea, the Pacific Islands Forum and the European Union in their capacity as observers.

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Japanese House Foods expands into the United States with Keystone Natural Holdings https://const-japan.com/japanese-house-foods-expands-into-the-united-states-with-keystone-natural-holdings/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:26:20 +0000 https://const-japan.com/japanese-house-foods-expands-into-the-united-states-with-keystone-natural-holdings/ Image credit: Nature’s Soy/Facebook Japanese tofu company House Foods has acquired US plant-based food maker Keystone Natural Holdings (KNH). The deal, announced Sept. 16, will expand House Foods’ portfolio of value-added tofu and plant-based food products. This means House Foods will expand its manufacturing facilities in North America from two to eight. KNH, with a […]]]>

Japanese tofu company House Foods has acquired US plant-based food maker Keystone Natural Holdings (KNH).

The deal, announced Sept. 16, will expand House Foods’ portfolio of value-added tofu and plant-based food products.

This means House Foods will expand its manufacturing facilities in North America from two to eight.

KNH, with a product line that includes American plant-based foods brand Nature’s Soy, was created by Chicago-based private investment firm Keystone Capital in 2016.

It produces and sells tofu, meat alternatives and other plant-based products in the United States and Canada.

The line also includes plant-based brand Franklin Farms and Superior Natural Canadian tofu.

KNH purchased WestSoy’s tofu, seitan and tempeh assets from natural and organic food giant Hain Celestial in 2019.

Chaoran Jin, Managing Director of Keystone Capital, said, “We are proud of the work we have done at KNH.

“During our partnership, we have invested significantly to expand the KNH brand presence, manufacturing capacity, product development capabilities, and management team to provide a wide range of food products. healthy and innovative plant-based products for groceries, clubs and food. service customers.

House Foods Group was founded in 1913 and today is one of the largest food suppliers in Japan.

In addition to North America, it is also looking to expand its business in Europe and other regions.

In fiscal 2021, the group’s net sales rose 1.3% to 253.4 billion yen ($1.76 billion) while its operating profit fell 1% to 19, 2 billion yen.

Kenny Sung, Managing Director of KNH, said, “Keystone Capital has helped us successfully expand into additional strategic segments, enabling us to better serve our retail and foodservice clients in the ethnic channel. and general public.

“We look forward to working with House Foods to continue our growth trajectory.”

House Foods said it sees “the driving force” of its growing plant-based market like Millennials and Gen Z, who “have a strong interest in climate change and tend to choose foods with low environmental impact.”

The proposed transaction, for an undisclosed amount, is expected to close at the end of the month.

Related companies

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News MotoGP 2022, Japanese Grand Prix, typhoon, Motegi, weather, disruption, cancellation https://const-japan.com/news-motogp-2022-japanese-grand-prix-typhoon-motegi-weather-disruption-cancellation/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:44:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/news-motogp-2022-japanese-grand-prix-typhoon-motegi-weather-disruption-cancellation/ This weekend’s Japanese Grand Prix is ​​in danger of being canceled due to a typhoon sweeping through southwestern Japan. Typhoon Nanmadol has been classified as a “severe” typhoon, Japan’s most severe tropical storm, and made landfall Sunday night on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s four main islands. With winds gusting up to 200 kilometers per […]]]>

This weekend’s Japanese Grand Prix is ​​in danger of being canceled due to a typhoon sweeping through southwestern Japan.

Typhoon Nanmadol has been classified as a “severe” typhoon, Japan’s most severe tropical storm, and made landfall Sunday night on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s four main islands.

With winds gusting up to 200 kilometers per hour from Monday, the Japan Meteorological Association issued a “special warning”, an alert level used only for the most extreme forecast conditions.

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Seven million people have been ordered to take shelter or evacuate. Already 200,000 homes are without electricity, while some parts of the country are expecting up to 400 millimeters of rain.

Although the typhoon’s path is expected to take it just north of the Motegi circuit by Tuesday before rolling out into the Pacific on Wednesday, the storm is disrupting air travel nationwide which could delay the arrival of MotoGP. in the country in time for the first day of tracking action on Friday.

The sport has a four-day deadline to cover more than 10,000 kilometers from Spain to Japan, but with the typhoon expected to hit the country until at least Wednesday, there is a real risk that cargo flights will not can’t land in time. getting ready for the weekend.

On Monday, All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines, the country’s two main airlines, canceled nearly 800 flights. More than 200 flights have been canceled at major airports in Tokyo and Osaka.

MotoGP freight and personnel are expected to leave Europe for Tokyo between Monday and Tuesday.

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The sport had already canceled Friday morning practices for all categories in light of tight deadlines and after suffering major freight delays between Indonesia and Argentina earlier this year. A technical problem on a cargo flight to Termas de Río Hondo forced the organizers to abandon Friday altogether.

But the extra half-day buffer may not be enough to account for typhoon delays if flights can’t land until late in the week.

To further complicate the decision-making, the Thai Grand Prix follows immediately after as the final leg of an ambitious triple-header of races. Although the typhoon will have passed by the end of the weekend, any delay in air traffic could cause further problems.

speed week reported that the International Road-Racing Teams Association already has a representative traveling to Japan to provide advance warning of potential issues and facilitate a smooth arrival in the event of significant delays.

Discussions had begun on Sunday evening between MotoGP organisers, teams and the circuit over contingency plans if flights could not arrive as scheduled, with cancellation due to force majeure reserved for the worst-case scenario.

Postponement is not an option given the busy nature of the schedule, with five races scheduled within seven weeks after Japan.

A cancellation would potentially benefit title leader Fabio Quartararo as Motegi’s long straights will be a boon to Ducati rival Francesco Bagnaia, although the Frenchman believes large braking zones could tip the balance of power at least a little back in his direction.

Quartararo is only 10 points ahead of Bagnaia on the titles table, but led the Italian by 91 points five races ago, with Ducati strong in the final half of the season.

The Japanese Grand Prix has been canceled for two years due to the pandemic, with the country remaining largely closed to overseas visitors until this year.

The race had previously run continuously since 1987, when it was held in Suzuka, southwest of Nagoya, before moving permanently to Motegi, about 150 kilometers northeast of Tokyo, in 2004 .

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As climate ‘tipping points’ approach, scientists predict the unthinkable https://const-japan.com/as-climate-tipping-points-approach-scientists-predict-the-unthinkable/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 05:56:58 +0000 https://const-japan.com/as-climate-tipping-points-approach-scientists-predict-the-unthinkable/ EXETER, ENGLAND – With new evidence that the ‘tipping points’ of catastrophic climate change are approaching – from soaring sea levels as polar ice melts to temperature spikes as methane escapes thawing permafrost – scientists are quietly planning the unthinkable. “The extreme risks associated with climate change are under-explored,” warned Luke Kemp, a researcher at […]]]>

With new evidence that the ‘tipping points’ of catastrophic climate change are approaching – from soaring sea levels as polar ice melts to temperature spikes as methane escapes thawing permafrost – scientists are quietly planning the unthinkable.

“The extreme risks associated with climate change are under-explored,” warned Luke Kemp, a researcher at the Center for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge, during a pioneering conference on the subject at the University of Cambridge. Run this week.

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Washington should focus on climate change for Pacific island leaders https://const-japan.com/washington-should-focus-on-climate-change-for-pacific-island-leaders/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 06:22:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/washington-should-focus-on-climate-change-for-pacific-island-leaders/ Hawaii Governor David Ige speaks during a community meeting about the ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea volcano at Pahoa Middle and High School in Pahoa, Hawaii, U.S., May 7, 2018. REUTERS /Terray Sylvester Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register SYDNEY, Sept 15 (Reuters) – Washington should accept Pacific island priorities for the […]]]>

Hawaii Governor David Ige speaks during a community meeting about the ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea volcano at Pahoa Middle and High School in Pahoa, Hawaii, U.S., May 7, 2018. REUTERS /Terray Sylvester

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SYDNEY, Sept 15 (Reuters) – Washington should accept Pacific island priorities for the region, making climate change – not superpower competition – the most pressing security task, the region’s leaders told Hawaii, ahead of a meeting with US President Joe Biden this month. .

“The sentiment shared by Pacific Island leaders is that they hope they can work with the Biden administration on our strategy and our plan, rather than having the White House and the United States come up with a plan for the region,” said the Governor of the US state of Hawaii, David Ige, at a press conference after the closed meeting.

A regional strategy called Pacific Blue Continent 2050 has been supported by all Pacific island nations and territories, Ige said.

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Leaders and officials from 16 Pacific island nations and territories attended Wednesday’s meeting in Honolulu.

Competition between China and the United States for influence in the Pacific islands has intensified this year, after China signed a security agreement with the Solomon Islands, prompting warnings of a militarization of the region. Read more

Biden will host the first meeting of Pacific Island leaders at the White House on September 28-29.

Increased engagement with Washington was “very welcome,” said David Panuelo, president of the Federated States of Micronesia and conference chair.

The United States and its allies Australia, Japan, New Zealand and Britain formed a group in June to discuss how to work together in the Pacific Islands region, seen as a counterweight to the growing influence of China.

Panuelo said the Pacific islands want China and the United States to “compete in a healthy way” to keep peace in the region.

Climate change will be a bigger challenge than World War II, he said, adding that “it’s like pulling teeth” for low-lying island states to access support from international climate funds .

Only 12 nations were invited to Washington, with French territories among those excluded for protocol reasons, and the meeting criticized the decision.

“When the United States invites our region, we want to include all members of the Pacific Islands Forum as a family,” Panuelo said, referring to the main regional group.

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Reporting by Kirsty Needham; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Top Concerns of High and Super Wealthy Investors in Asia-Pacific https://const-japan.com/top-concerns-of-high-and-super-wealthy-investors-in-asia-pacific/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 23:10:48 +0000 https://const-japan.com/top-concerns-of-high-and-super-wealthy-investors-in-asia-pacific/ Singapore has become a hub for private equity in Asia. Roslan Rahman | AFP | Getty Images Ultra-wealthy Asia-Pacific investors are moving away from the ‘wait-and-see’ approach they took at the start of the pandemic as concerns about market volatility took hold, a new survey from the bank shows. private Swiss Lombard Odier. The survey […]]]>

Singapore has become a hub for private equity in Asia.

Roslan Rahman | AFP | Getty Images

Ultra-wealthy Asia-Pacific investors are moving away from the ‘wait-and-see’ approach they took at the start of the pandemic as concerns about market volatility took hold, a new survey from the bank shows. private Swiss Lombard Odier.

The survey of 450 high-net-worth investors from the region – defined as those with at least $1 million in investable assets domiciled in Asia-Pacific – revealed their top concerns.

They understood how to manage current market volatility and geopolitical risks, as well as how to better diversify their portfolio to mitigate those risks, according to the 2022 HNW Individuals (HNWIs) study.

The urgency of these strategies has increased since the 2020 survey, Lombard Odier said.

“During the peak of COVID-19 in 2020, the majority of APAC HNWIs surveyed did not change their portfolio characteristics and adopted a wait and see approach,” said Jean-Francois Aboulker.

“This was mainly due to a lack of understanding of the risks involved and uncertainty about the evolution of the pandemic”.

High inflation

Today, approximately 68% of investors in Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, Taiwan and Australia have realigned or changed their portfolios to better deal with current market conditions.

Even though the impact of Covid-19 is global, equity returns diverge significantly across countries and some asset classes are underrepresented in some markets.

Jean-Francois Aboulker

Lombard Odier

About 77% of respondents said rising inflation and the prospect of a recession were the most worrying. Singaporeans were the most worried about this condition.

“Even Japan, where inflation had been near zero for more than three decades, is now facing inflationary pressure, and 69% of Japanese HNWIs are worried about it,” the report said.

“It’s unclear whether the Bank of Japan will tighten, but a third of Japanese HNWIs believe it will happen in the next 12 months.”

Rising rates

Affluent investors in the region are generally less concerned about a possible rise in interest rates, mainly because they think most governments will be careful not to raise rates to the point of hurting economic growth, according to the report. ‘investigation.

However, Australian and Indonesian investors are not so sure. A majority of respondents in these countries, around 70%, say higher interest rates are a “significant concern”.

Geopolitical risks

Investors in the Philippines are most concerned about geopolitical instability, while those in Hong Kong and Singapore also cited geopolitical tensions as one of the top risks over the next 12 months.

These investors are concerned about the impact of geopolitical risk and conflict on their investment returns, with many expecting lower returns ahead. They also worry about missing opportunities in this volatile time.

Many in Hong Kong and Japan have questioned the effectiveness of their current diversification strategies given the negative impact of the current environment of “falling equity prices, widening credit and interest rate spreads long-term highs” on their portfolios.

Two things happened

In an effort to mitigate these risks, two things happened.

Ultra-wealthy investors in APAC have become more conservative and are turning more away from traditional asset classes — such as stocks and bonds — to investing in their own businesses, the survey found.

Many have also placed money in “safer” assets such as silver and gold. Some are also investing in private assets, including private equity, private debt, real estate and infrastructure investments, and investors in Singapore and Australia are leading the charge.

Additionally, many investors have moved away from their home markets over the past couple of years. To manage post-Covid uncertainty, a more holistic combination of their portfolios has been the result and Japanese and Indonesian investors are actively doing so, according to the report.

“Even though the impact of Covid-19 is global, there are significant divergences in equity returns in different countries, and certain asset classes are underrepresented in certain markets,” said Aboulker of Lombard Odier.

“These investors are sophisticated and understand the importance of a long-term approach in finding assets beyond their home markets, while reducing their dependence on home factors.”

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Worsening Tokyo Olympics corruption scandal casts shadow over 2030 bid https://const-japan.com/worsening-tokyo-olympics-corruption-scandal-casts-shadow-over-2030-bid/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 03:54:00 +0000 https://const-japan.com/worsening-tokyo-olympics-corruption-scandal-casts-shadow-over-2030-bid/ TOKYO: A corruption scandal engulfing last summer’s pandemic-delayed Tokyo Games has cast a dark cloud over Sapporo’s 2030 bid and raised new questions in Japan about hosting the Olympics again. Former Tokyo 2020 executive Haruyuki Takahashi was arrested on corruption charges in August and further allegations were brought against him last week as part of […]]]>

TOKYO: A corruption scandal engulfing last summer’s pandemic-delayed Tokyo Games has cast a dark cloud over Sapporo’s 2030 bid and raised new questions in Japan about hosting the Olympics again.

Former Tokyo 2020 executive Haruyuki Takahashi was arrested on corruption charges in August and further allegations were brought against him last week as part of a wider probe into corruption at the heart of the Games.

The scandal comes at a bad time for the city of Sapporo in northern Japan, which is bidding to host the 2030 Winter Olympics.

Sapporo hosted the Games in 1972 and is considered a favorite despite competition from Vancouver and Salt Lake City.

Sapporo Mayor Katsuhiro Akimoto and Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) President Yasuhiro Yamashita were due to visit the International Olympic Committee headquarters in Lausanne to talk about the bid later this month.

The delegation canceled the trip last week, Yamashita blaming a scheduling problem.

Akimoto said it had “nothing to do with the corruption case surrounding the Tokyo Olympics”.

But the controversy has made headlines in major Japanese newspapers and prosecutors have carried out new searches in recent days.

Takahashi, a 78-year-old former chief executive of Japanese advertising giant Dentsu, is suspected of accepting bribes in exchange for helping companies become official sponsors of the Tokyo Games.

Former and current executives of business suit retailer Aoki Holdings and major publishing house Kadokawa were also arrested.

And local media are reporting that Takahashi claimed to have given money to then-Tokyo 2020 president Yoshiro Mori, a former Japanese prime minister.

The controversy has helped reignite anti-Olympic sentiment in Japan, which has seen an outpouring of opposition to hosting the Tokyo Games amid a pandemic.

The Asahi Shimbun daily, in an editorial, urged Sapporo to “wait” its 2030 bid until the scandal is “resolved”.

He said the Japanese public viewed the Olympics “with distrust and suspicion”.

Last year, the Asahi called for the cancellation of the Tokyo Olympics just two months before they started, accusing IOC officials of being “lighthouses”.

MAKE IT A MEAL?

Despite all the national attention on the scandal, experts doubt it will have an impact when the IOC comes down to choosing a 2030 host.

With cities increasingly reluctant to shoulder the expense and controversy of hosting the Games, the IOC cannot afford to be picky.

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As you drive, tires emit pollution. And electric vehicles make the problem worse. https://const-japan.com/as-you-drive-tires-emit-pollution-and-electric-vehicles-make-the-problem-worse/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 02:28:31 +0000 https://const-japan.com/as-you-drive-tires-emit-pollution-and-electric-vehicles-make-the-problem-worse/ The Tire Collective does not yet have a name for its device. Hanson Cheng, one of the three co-founders of the London-based startup, calls it a “box”. Designed to attach behind the steering wheel of a car, truck, van or bus, it is designed to capture emissions from an often overlooked source: tires. Every vehicle […]]]>

The Tire Collective does not yet have a name for its device. Hanson Cheng, one of the three co-founders of the London-based startup, calls it a “box”. Designed to attach behind the steering wheel of a car, truck, van or bus, it is designed to capture emissions from an often overlooked source: tires.

Every vehicle sheds tiny bits of its tires as it drives, but “where the rubber meets the road” is a bit of a misnomer: Most passenger vehicle tires contain little natural rubber. Instead, they’re made from a stew of petrochemicals, the particles of which eventually end up in the soil, air, waterways and oceans.

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