31-year-old faces jail after police find over £ 1million in counterfeit banknotes


31-year-old faces jail after police find more than £ 1million in counterfeit banknotes hidden in suitcases in his apartment

  • Detectives raided Emil Bodgan Savastru’s home in east London in January last year
  • They found a bag with hundreds of £ 50 and 200 euro bills stuffed in cases
  • Agents shared notes with the Bank of England which confirmed they were fake
  • Savastru was found guilty of having custody or control of a counterfeit banknote










A 31-year-old man faces jail after police find more than £ 1million in counterfeit banknotes hidden in suitcases in his apartment.

Detectives from the Met’s Specialist Crime Command raided Emil Bogdan Savastru’s home in Bow, east London, in January last year.

During their search, they found a bag containing hundreds of £ 50 and € 200 banknotes, crammed into large crates.

Agents shared the banknotes with the Bank of England, who examined them and confirmed they were fake.

Detectives from the Met’s Specialist Crime Command raided Emil Bogdan Savastru’s home in Bow, east London, in January last year

During their search they found a bag with hundreds of what appeared to be £ 50 and 200 euro bills crammed into large crates.

During their search they found a bag with hundreds of what appeared to be £ 50 and 200 euro bills crammed into large crates.

Officers shared the banknotes with the Bank of England, who examined them and confirmed they were fake

Officers shared the banknotes with the Bank of England, who examined them and confirmed they were fake

Later that same day, Savastru was arrested at London Heathrow Airport while waiting to board a flight to Japan after documents he left at the scene linked him to the crime .

When questioned, he declined to explain how the notes were in his possession, where he got them from, or what he planned to do with them.

A jury at Isleworth Crown Court this week found Savastru guilty on one count of custody or control of a counterfeit banknote.

Detective Constable Andrew Payne, who led the investigation, said: “Our proactive operation means that we have been able to remove a significant amount of counterfeit banknotes from circulation.

“Without a doubt, these notes would have been used to commit other crimes across the UK.

“This successful lawsuit relied heavily on the close collaboration between the Met and the Bank of England, leaving little doubt that Savastru was guilty of these offenses.

“Counterfeit currency in the UK hurts the economy and has a real and significant impact on businesses that unknowingly take possession of it. As this lawsuit shows, we will take action against anyone involved in this type of crime.

Savastru will be sentenced by the same court on February 10.


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